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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by Columbia University\'s Secretary FRANK D. FACKENTHAL, the de facto administrator of the Pulitzer Prize, replying on behalf of University President Butler to James B. Pond\'s invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck\'s first American lecture.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by Columbia University's Secretary FRANK D. FACKENTHAL, the de facto administrator of the Pulitzer Prize, replying on behalf of University President Butler to James B. Pond's invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck's first American lecture.

By Fackenthal, Frank D. (1883-1968). American academic administrator who was long associated with Columbia University and, as secretary and provost of that institution, was the administrator of the Pulitzer Prize.

New York: December 12, 1919., 1919.. Very good. - Over 50 words typed on his 9-3/8 inch high by 8 inch wide "Columbia University / in the City of New York / Secretary of the University" stationery. Frank D. Fackenthal convey's Columbia University President Butler's reply to American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond's invitation to serve on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America. Fackenthal writes "President Butler asks me to say in reply to your letter of December 10 that he will be very glad to serve on the honorary reception committee for Maurice Maeterlinck". Signed "Frank D. Fackenthal". The letter is folded for mailing and there is a small piece out from the top left corner. Very good. The American academic administrator Frank Diehl Fackenthal (1883-1968) had a long association with Columbia University. Starting as the University's chief clerk in 1906, he was elevated to the position of secretary in 1910 and subsequently served as the institution's provost from 1937 through 1948. In both of these latter capacities, he was the de facto administrator of the Pulitzer Prize from its inception. Despite Butler's opposition, he served as the University's acting president following Nicholas Murray Butler's retirement in 1945 until Dwight D. Eisenhower took over in 1948. He developed far ranging plans for the University that might have addressed the problems which led to the 1968 Columbia University Protests but were eschewed by his successors. He was successful in establishing the School of General Studies and the graduate level School of International Affairs and the Harriman Institute. After retiring from the University, he served as educational consultant to the Carnegie Corporation and president of Columbia University Press and remained a trustee of numerous institutions.James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides.

$35.00

CATALOGUE AND CIRCULAR OF THE WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, AT FARMINGTON, ME 1867-8.
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CATALOGUE AND CIRCULAR OF THE WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, AT FARMINGTON, ME 1867-8.

By (Western State Normal School).

Augusta, ME: Owen & Nash, Printers to the State, 1868., 1868.. Fair. - Octavo, softcover bound in tan wrappers. The binding is dampstained & creased, including 2 vertical creases to each wrap. 16 pages. The pages are bumped & creased with dampstaining. Fair working copy. The first 10 pages of this pamphlet list the names and addresses of students, both women and men, attending the Western State Normal College in Farmington, Maine. Following this is general information about the school: "This Institution, established for the purpose of preparing teachers for the Common Schools of our State, went into operation August 24, 1864." Students who intend to teach in Maine receive free tuition but students who wish to teach in other states are also admitted. A general outline of the curriculum, which includes a wide range of scientific, literary and artistic studies is given in the rear along with the school's regulations.SCARCE.

$125.00

A COLLECTION of 29 ORIGINAL CYANOTYPE PHOTOGRAPHS of ST. STEPHEN\'S COLLEGE later to become BARD COLLEGE together with 14 ORIGINAL PAMPHLETS, BROCHURES & OTHER ORIGINAL EPHEMERAL PUBLICATIONS, including 3 related to the ritual \
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A COLLECTION of 29 ORIGINAL CYANOTYPE PHOTOGRAPHS of ST. STEPHEN'S COLLEGE later to become BARD COLLEGE together with 14 ORIGINAL PAMPHLETS, BROCHURES & OTHER ORIGINAL EPHEMERAL PUBLICATIONS, including 3 related to the ritual "BURYING OF THE ALGEBRA".

By [Bard, John & Margaret]. [Bard College].

Annandale, NY: 1890 through 1896. [1890's], [1890's]. Good. - A collection of original photographs and original brochures and ephemeral publications relating to St. Stephen's College of Annandale, NY, which was founded by John & Margaret Bard and was later to become Bard College, of Annandale-on-the-Hudson. Included are 30 original photographs including 29 cyanotypes, 13 of which depict college buildings, the remaining 17 being portraits and scenery, including the campus, Zabriskies Falls, and interiors. The cyan-tinged images range from 4 inches high by 3-1/4 inches wide to 9 inches high by 6-1/2 inches wide with a variety of sizes in between. One of the images is an exception, being sienna-toned and not, in fact, a cyanotype. The photographs are in various condition, some are fine while others are creased or lightly stained with one portrait having several tears to the edges.Also included in this collection are 14 ephemeral publications and brochures relating to St. Stephen's College with programs and flyers for events, including 3 relating to the ritual burying of the algebra by incoming freshmen. The items were all apparently once removed from a scrapbook and thus the condition varies. A few have stains while several have remnants of paper or glue on the versos. Following is a list of the images represented by the photographs:1) The entrance to Potter Hall (part of Stone Row) with a horse-drawn cart.2) An unidentified image which looks like a dormitory building.3) Chapel of Holy Innocents and St. Margaret's Well with the Stone Row dormitories in the background4) Chapel of Holy Innocents & St. Margaret's Well (1890) [Part of Stone Row in the background].5) Bard Hall (1891). [There are glue or chemical stains to the edges of this photo].6) An unidentified image. [This is a small photo with creasing & stains].7) Aspinwall Hall.8) Interior of the Chapel of Holy Innocents, Christmas 1890. (There is a light corner stain).9) Chapel of Holy Innocents, 1891. (There is a light corner stain).10) Interior of the Chapel of Holy Innocents (decorated at Christmas).11) Chapel of Holy Innocents.12) Landscape in snow, with the Chapel of Holy Innocents & St. Margaret's Well. (There is creasing to this photo, mainly at the edges).13) "Stone Row" dormitories (1893), with the Chapel of Holy Innocents & St. Margaret's Well in the foreground.14) Interior of a dorm room with 2 students.15) A staged photo of 2 students in wedding attire, one is in drag.16) Three Class of 1894 students. (This photo has a crease along the center).17 through 22) Six different photos of Zabriskies Falls. (One, a small sepia-toned photo has a crease along the edge, another has minor creases and a third has a light stain).23) Large group of students in front of the Chapel of Holy Innocents.24) Three students. (There is creasing to this photo).25) A view of the campus.26) Photo of the Class of 1897. (This photo is quite dark).27) Interior of a room with 2 students.28) A group of 13 students (June 1893).29) A view from the campus showing the Catskills & Hudson River.30) A portrait of the President of the College, Robert B Fairbairn.The ephemera related to St. Stephen's College consists of:1) A 4-page "St. Stephen's College Glee Club" program bound in cream wraps titled in red with a silk cord. The program is dated "March '93" in ink at the bottom of the cover.2) A 2-page "St. Stephen's College" brochure. The top edge of the second page is trimmed without loss of text.3) A 4-page St. Stephen's College "Field Day / June 20, 1893" brochure with penciled notes indicating the winners.4) The 4-page "Thirty-Fourth Commencement" program. Dated June 21, 1894.5) "The St. Stephen's College Messenger" issue dated April 1896.6) A broadside of the St. Stephen's College schedule and rules. The broadside is stained.7) A small card with the program for the "Eulexian Society Reunion Supper" (a literary society), dated June 21, 1893.8) An announcement printed on mourning stationery regretting that "The Class of Ninety-six" could not invite the recipient to "the burying of its Algebra on account of the secrecy of the burial". Together with the original mourning envelope.9) A 3-page program for the "Laying of the Corner-stone" of the Hoffman Library dated June 22, 1893. Construction of the library began in 1893 and was completed in 1895.10) A humorous description of the death and burial of algebra in 1894 and it's subsequent exhumation by the class of 1897. The 4-page announcement is printed on light gray card stock shaped as a tombstone. The original mourning envelope is present.11) A 4-page program with class statistics entitled "Class Day S. Stephen's College. June 15, 1892". In addition to age, height and weight, the statistics include favorite drink ("brandy", "rain water", "blood" etc), favorite study ("himself", "women", "how to do nothing", etc)), favorite amusement "sleeping", scrapping", "being sick", etc), and others.12) The 4-page "Thirty-Third Annual Commencement" program dated June 22, 1893 with profuse penciled notes.13) Unused 4-page "St. Stephen's College" letterhead.14) The 1894 "Funeral" program for algebra printed in red on buff card stock in the shape of a coffin. Purple mourning lines frame the edges of the 4 pages of card stock which is bound at the top with red cotton ribbon.The tradition behind the burial of the algebra was sort of a light hazing ritual performed by freshmen students. Thirty days after arriving at Bard, the freshmen were to steal an algebra book which they were to then sign and bury with several bottles of wine. Then, the night before commencement the students now seniors, would dig it up and consume the wine, raising a toast to their graduating class. The ritual is described as follows in a 1930 issue of the Lyre Tree, a student newspaper: "There is a tradition of long standing at St. Stephen's that within 30 days after the close of the first semester the Freshman class shall, with all the ritual and solemnity due to the occasion, secretly inter an algebra, autographed by each member of the class and with it a certain quantity of wine. To be legal, every Freshman must be at the grave during the burial. At the end of the four years, the algebra is exhumed and burned on a funeral pyre, during the Class Day exercises. Toasts are drunk to the college and to the outgoing and incoming Senior class.""St. Stephen's College was established as a Training College for the Ministry, and as such it was requested to make an annual report to the Convention of the Diocese of New York. The object was the supervision of the young men who had devoted themselves to the ministry of the Church. It was afterwards opened to any who would not disturb the general purpose for which it was originally instituted." [Quoted from "The Thirty-First Annual Catalogue of St. Stephen's College, Annandale, N.Y. 1892-93".The land now owned by Bard College was once composed of several country estates, Blithewood, Bartlett, Sands, Cruger's Island, and Ward Manor/Almont among them. John & Margaret Bard purchased a part of the Blithewood estate in 1853. Renaming the property as Annandale, they established a parish school the following year. They then began building the Chapel of the Innocents next to Bard Hall in 1857 and the following year donated the unfinished Chapel and surrounding acreage to New York's Episcopal diocese which had promised financial support to grow the school into a theological college. St. Stephen's College was thus founded in 1860. In honor of its founder, the school changed its name to Bard College in 1934. Ten years later, in 1944, Bard became a co-educational school, welcoming female students and faculty.

$1500.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY DISTINGUISHED EDUCATOR AND PRESIDENT OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY DISTINGUISHED EDUCATOR AND PRESIDENT OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY NICHOLAS MURRAY BUTLER.

By Butler, Nicholas Murray. (1862-1947). Educator and President of Columbia University.

New York: November 26, 1928., 1928.. Good. - 71 words typed on a cream-colored 10-1/4 inch high by 8 inch wide sheet of Columbia University letterhead with the university's name and "President's Room" printed in raised lettering in blue at the top. Signed "Nicholas Murray Butler'. The bottom edge of the letterhead is darkened with 2 short tears & a chip out of the bottom left corner. There is some light soiling to the top horizontal fold. Folded 4 times for mailing. Good. Butler writes to future Congressman Seymour Halpern: "If you are expecting to enter Columbia College you must get in communication with the Director of Admissions at an early day....Hundreds of students of ordinary preparation and accomplishment are turned away each year through lack of our capacity to care for them."Nicholas Murray Butler [1862-1947] was an educator, an advisor to seven presidents, a prolific author and the recipient of numerous international decorations and honorary degrees. He was a recipient of the Noble Peace Prize in 1931. His good friend Theodore Roosevelt called him "Nicholas Miraculous Butler". Four years after joining the staff of Columbia's Philosophy Department in 1885 Butler gave administrative form to his philosophical theory of pedagogy by founding an institute, later affiliated with Columbia, which became known as Teachers College. He was named acting president of Columbia University in 1901 and president in 1902, a post he held until his retirement in October 1945. Columbia grew phenomenally under his presidency and became a major university.The Queens, New York Republican Congressman Seymour Halpern (1913-1997), at this time still a high school student, started his political career as a campaign aide to New York's powerful mayor Fiorella La Guardia and first served in New York's State Senate for 14 years before seeking a seat in the U.S. Congress. In Albany Halpern sponsored 279 bills that became law, including measures on schools, housing, civil rights, nutrition and mental health. A Liberal, he was something of an anomaly as the lone Republican representative from New York City, and generally garnered support from Labor Unions and endorsement from the Liberal Party. Yet he never even considered switching parties as he considered membership in the Republican Party a family tradition and commitment. While he found ample time for his private pursuits, including painting and collecting autographs, he took his legislative duties very seriously. Of these, he was proudest of his co-sponsorship of the 1964 Civil Rights Act and of the original 1965 Medicare legislation.

$45.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY CHILDREN\'S AUTHOR AND MONTESSORI EDUCATOR RITA KISSIN ASKING JAMES B. POND IF GERMAN LECTURE AGENTS HAVE NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVES.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY CHILDREN'S AUTHOR AND MONTESSORI EDUCATOR RITA KISSIN ASKING JAMES B. POND IF GERMAN LECTURE AGENTS HAVE NEW YORK REPRESENTATIVES.

By Kissin, Rita. (b. 1885). Author of children's books and operator of Montessori kindergartens.

New York: April 11, 1927., 1927.. Very good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling both sides of a 3-1/2 inch high by 6-1/4 inch wide gray card. Signed "Rita Kissin". A blue check mark to the right of Pond's address indicates he has answered the letter. Near fine. Kissin writes to James B. Pond of the New York City Pond Lecture Bureau telling him she is planning a lecture tour of German-speaking countries in Europe and asking him to let her know whether German lecture agents have representatives in New York. "I speak in German and have credentials from, Postmaster General [Harry] New, Secretary [of State Frank B.] Kellogg and the German Ambassador".Born in the U.S. in 1885 and educated in Germany and Russia to the age of fourteen, Rita Kissin returned to America to complete her education. After graduating from the Second International Montessori Training Course in Rome in 1914 she organized and operated Montessori kindergartens in New York and New Jersey. Two years later she began lecturing for the New York Board of Education on European travel and the Montessori Method. She worked briefly for the Universal Film Company in the 1920s, wrote publicity stories for Mary Pickford, Cecil B. De Mille and others and became Hollywood correspondent for Frankfurter Zeitung. In the thirties she studied psychology at the New School for Social Research and acted as a consultant in the Montessori Method to schools in Honolulu. Kissin was the author of children's books and also wrote about the Montessori Method and her own experiences of training for and practicing this method of teaching.

$75.00

MEMORY AND INTELLECTUAL IMPROVEMENT APPLIED TO SELF-EDUCATION AND JUVENILE INSTRUCTION. By O.S. Fowler, practical phrenologist.

By Fowler, O.S.

New York: Fowlers and Wells, Phrenological Cabinet, 1849., 1849.. Fair. - Octavo, black cloth titled and decorated in gilt on the spine and decorated in blind on the covers. The covers are rubbed with wear to the corners and head and tail of the spine. There is evidence of early worming with a few holes along the joints. 231 pages plus a 6-page catalog of phrenological publications, with textual illustrations pertaining to phrenology. There is offsetting and darkening to the endpapers and blanks with occasional light foxing and stains to the pages. There is dampstaining to the bottom edges of the pages. Good.

$15.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN EDUCATOR AND CLERGYMAN TIMOTHY DWIGHT V, THE FUTURE PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN EDUCATOR AND CLERGYMAN TIMOTHY DWIGHT V, THE FUTURE PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE.

By Dwight V, Timothy. (1828-1916). American educator and clergyman, elected president of Yale College in 1886.

New Haven, CT: January 27, 1866., 1866.. Very good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling 2 sides of a sheet of note paper folded to form 4 sides, each 8-1/2 inches high by 5 inches wide. Signed "T. Dwight." The letter is docketed on the 4th side. There is a paper-clip mark on the top edge of each side with some minor soiling to the 4th side. Folded 3 times for mailing. Very good. Dwight writes to a friend explaining somewhat circuitously why he has not been able to let him know whether he may or may not be attending a supper following a meeting of Yale graduates in Boston. "An invitation having been received by Pres. Woolsey, asking the presence of such delegates at the supper, as the Faculty might nominate, the Faculty, much to my surprise, voted to send me as one of the delegates, and I have been much inclined to go. I have been unable to determine, however, with absolute certainty until now, and even now I find certain unforeseen circumstances which may keep me at home. If I am able to be with you I shall greatly enjoy it, but if I am detained at home, at the last moment, you must not suppose it is through any want of good will or regard for you and my other friends in Boston...".Timothy Dwight V [1828-1916] was an American academic and educator and a Congregational minister. He was educated at Yale and became professor of sacred literature in the Divinity School in 1858. In 1886 he was elected president of Yale College. It was during his years as the school's president that Yale's schools first organized as a university. His grandfather was Timothy Dwight IV, who served as President of Yale College ninety years before his grandson's tenure.

$75.00

TYPED LETTER TO HAROLD RUGG OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S TEACHERS COLLEGE SIGNED BY HARRY A. BROWN, SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, NEEDHAM, MASS.
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TYPED LETTER TO HAROLD RUGG OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S TEACHERS COLLEGE SIGNED BY HARRY A. BROWN, SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS, NEEDHAM, MASS.

By (Rugg, Harold). Brown, Harry A. Superintendent of Schools, Needham, Mass.

Needham, MA: September 7, 1946., 1946.. Good. - Lengthy 3-page letter typed on an 11 inch high by 8-1/2 inch wide sheet of his personalized letterhead with his name & address printed in raised lettering in blind at top left and on 2 follow-up sheets. Signed "Harry A. Brown". There is a rusty paper-clip mark on each sheet at top left. On the first sheet this mark affects the printed address & is surrounded by some additional staining. There are a few tiny chips to the letter & the upper right edge of each sheet is creased. Folded twice for mailing. Good. <p>A friendly letter with excellent content to Harold Rugg, professor at Teachers College of Columbia University. Brown congratulates Rugg on the addition of Miss B. Marian Brooks to the faculty of Teachers College. He expresses his fears that able young people are not being appointed to the faculty and that "the few great minds" will all be retired in another ten years. "Miss Brooks represents to me just the kind of person who ought to be growing up with Teachers College to be a source of power for the Institution in another five or ten years. If I may speak in terms of Expressionism, I look upon people like Miss Brooks as an objectification of yourself, not in sound or in a painting or in a skyscraper; but in personality. Great teachers like yourself are great creative artist just as much as Sullivan, Whitman, and all the others that one could name. You create in just as real a sense as they have....When you produce, after three years of study, a person like Miss Brooks, it is self-portraiture of the most valuable kind...."<p>Harold Rugg [1886-1960] was an educational reformer associated with the Progressive education movement. Originally trained in civil engineering, he went on to study psychology, sociology and education at the University of Illinois. After teaching at the University of Chicago from 1915 to 1920, he took a job at the Teachers College where he stayed until he retired in 1951. He became a spokesman for the reconstructionist perspective which viewed formal education as an agent of social change.<p>Dr. Marian Brooks taught in a one-room schoolhouse in Milan, NH in the 1920s. She applied the lessons she learned there when she served as Chairwoman of the City College of New York Education Department. She was one of the founders of the "Open Corridors" program. She co-authored with Rugg "The Teacher in School and Society" [1950].

$50.00

TYPED LETTER TO HAROLD RUGG OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S TEACHERS COLLEGE SIGNED BY RUTGERS UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR HOUSTON PETERSON.
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TYPED LETTER TO HAROLD RUGG OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY'S TEACHERS COLLEGE SIGNED BY RUTGERS UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR HOUSTON PETERSON.

By Peterson, Houston. (1897-1981). Professor at Rutgers University who specialized in the philosophy of literature.

New York: October 10, 1948., 1948.. Good. - 109 words typed on a sheet of 11-inch high by 8-1/2 inch wide paper. Signed "Houston Peterson". The lower right edge of the paper is creased. The top edge is slightly darkened & the top left corner is creased with 2 pinholes where the letter has been stapled. Folded 3 times for mailing. Good. <p>Peterson writes to Rugg suggesting dates for a proposed lunch meeting with Rugg's group at Teacher's College; "I am exhausted, just having listened to the fifth game of the world's series while working on a lecture -- and tomorrow night I leave for a fortnight in the southwest. So this will be brief!..."<p>Houston Peterson [1897-1981] was a professor of philosophy at Rutgers University who specialized in the philosophy of literature. He was known for his dramatic lectures both in an out of the classroom and appeared frequently on radio and television in the 1950s. In one early television series, "The Mahatma and the Professor" he discussed philosophy and baseball with Branch Rickey, a former owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers. He was also known for his free forum at Cooper Union where leading thinkers and writers of the day, such as Eleanor Roosevelt, Thomas Mann and Margaret Mead, addressed as many as 54,000 people a year.<p>Harold Rugg [1886-1960] was an educational reformer associated with the Progressive education movement. Originally trained in civil engineering, he went on to study psychology, sociology and education at the University of Illinois. After teaching at the University of Chicago from 1915 to 1920, he took a job at the Columbia University Teachers College where he stayed until he retired in 1951.

$25.00

AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED BY PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE THEODORE D. WOOLSEY DISMISSING CHARLES HALLOCK OF "FOREST AND STREAM" FROM THE COLLEGE.
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AUTOGRAPH NOTE SIGNED BY PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE THEODORE D. WOOLSEY DISMISSING CHARLES HALLOCK OF "FOREST AND STREAM" FROM THE COLLEGE.

By Woolsey, Theodore D. (1801-1889). President of Yale College 1846 to 1871.

Yale College: May 6, 1851.. 1851.. Good. - 20 words penned on the first side of a sheet of light gray paper which has been folded once to form 4 sides, each 10-1/2 inches high by 8-1/4 inches wide. There is a raised seal in blind at top left. Signed "Theodore D. Woolsey, President". Folded 8 times for mailing. The corners & edges of the letter are creased with a short tear & a few tiny chips at the folds. Good. <p>An amusing note stating that "Charles Hallock, an unmatriculated student of the Freshman Class" is honorably dismissed from the college at his father's request. Charles Hallock went on to graduate from Amherst College. He became the financial editor of Harper's Weekly and founded the sportsmen's magazine Forest and Stream. The city of Hallock in Northwest Minnesota was named after him.<p>Theodore Dwight Woolsey [1801-1889] was an American academic and author and the influential President of Yale from 1846 through 1871.

$75.00

A LIBERAL EDUCATION OR NOT. To the Young Men of New England: A Statement of the Condition and Objects of the Chandler Scientific Department of Dartmouth College, And Answers to Questions Often Proposed Respecting an Education and Going to College.

By Woodman, John S.

Hanover, NH: [Dartmouth College], 1863.. 1863.. Good. - Octavo, unbound, removed at some time in the past from a larger bound volume of pamphlets. 16 pages sewn with tan cord. The title page & the last leaf are nearly detached & there is some staining & foxing to the last page. The top corners of the rear pages are lightly bumped. Good. <p>John S. Woodman, Professor of Civil Engineering, advises the young men of New England as to what considerations they should keep in mind when deciding whether to go to college and what courses they should take.

$25.00

FACING LIFE: An Address to the Graduating Class of Cornell University June 23rd 1921

By Smith, Albert W

Ithaca, NY: Cornell University, 1921.. 1921.. Good. SIGNED BY ALBERT W. SMITH - Octavo, brown cloth with a printed label on the front cover. The binding is bumped. The head & tail of the spine are chipped. The spine is rubbed with some discoloration & a small chip out, possibly where a label has detached or been removed. Title & 32 pages. The contents are very good. Good. <p>Signed by Albert W. Smith on the front endpaper. Smith was the Chair of Cornell's Engineering Department and later president of the University.<p>Rare. WorldCat locates one copy.

$75.00

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY CHRONICLE. Volume LXII 2000-2001 (Number 2 Winter 2001). (With Supplement)

By (Murrin, John M.; Nugent, S. Georgia; et al) (Oberfranc, Gretchen; editor)

(Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Library, 2003).. 2003).. Fine. - Octavo, printed cream wrappers. [vi], pages 161-334 & [2] pages. Black- and-white illustrations. Fine.<p>Together with: PRINCETON UNIVERSITY LIBRARY CHRONICLE. Volume LXIII, Numbers 1 & 2. Autumn 2001-Winter 2002. Supplement. Octavo, printed cream wrappers. 25 pages. Illustrated with facsimiles. Fine. <p>The Supplement refers to a three-day conference, "Celebrating Jewish-American Writers" hosted by Princeton in October 2001. A collection of writings by Jewish American writers was published in a double issue of the Chronicle [Volume LXIII, Numbers 1 & 2]. This supplement to that issue publishes facsimiles of correspondence that was not available earlier, including letters from Saul Bellow, Bernard Malamud, S. J. Perelman and Delmore Schwartz.

$10.00

MANUAL OF THE SCHOOL LAWS OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK / Containing all the Essential Points Pertaining to Citizens, Teachers, and School Officers, to Jan. 1887

By Pooler, C. T

New York: E. L. Kellogg & Co., (1886),. (1886),. Very good. - 12mo [4-3/4 inches high by 3-5/8 inches wide], softcover bound in printed dark green stiff paper wraps. The wraps are bumped & lightly rubbed with some light staining to the top inner corner of the front cover. 50 pages. There is a bookseller's stamp on the front endpaper with a contemporary owner's ink name & date. The bottom corners of the rear endpaper are creased & there is minor staining to the endpaper. Very good. <p>Second edition. Included is a section on teachers', children's and parents' rights. A very scarce booklet.

$35.00

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 1400-1934. With a Description of the New Building Opened by His Majesty the King 22 October 1934 / And an Acount of the New Science Buildings of Agriculture, Botany, Physiology and Zoology

By (Cambridge University)

Cambridge: The Cambridge University Press, 1934.. 1934.. Very good. - Small quarto [9-3/4 inches high by 7-1/4 inches wide] softcover bound in printed gray wrappers. The spine & the adjacent edges of the wraps are darkened. The edges of the wraps are slightly creased & there is a small stain to the rear wrap. Title, 15 & [1] pages. Black-and-white frontispiece & black-and-white illustrations. The gutters are a bit darkened. Very good. <p>Laid in are a plan of the new science buildings and the original four-page program for the visit of the King and Queen and the opening of the library. The edges of the program are creased.

$50.00

THE LIGHTER SIDE OF SCHOOL LIFE

By (Baumer, Lewis). Hay, Ian

London, Edinburgh and Boston: T. N. Foulis, Publisher, (1914).. (1914).. Good. - Octavo, brown cloth titled in gilt. The binding is lightly bumped & rubbed with some staining to the bottom edge & top corner of the front cover. 226 & [1] pages plus 15-page publisher's catalog. 12 color plates with tissue guards after pastel drawings by Lewis Baumer. There is a previous owner's ink name on the front endpaper. The overlapping front edges of some leaves are darkened with tiny chips. Good. <p>First edition.

$20.00

EXPOSITION / Technical & Popular

By Gould, Jay Reid; and Olmsted, Stirling P.; editors

New York: Longmans, Green and Co., 1947.. 1947.. Good. - Octavo, blue cloth. The binding is lightly rubbed with spotting to the spine & extremities and some very light staining to the front cover. x & 126 pages. Illustrated with a few tables & diagrams. There is a red pencil marking on page 85 indicating a spelling mistake, else the contents are very good. Good. <p>First edition.<p>A manual on technical writing for the specialized or lay reader, with examples from various authors.

$10.00

CATALOGUS SENATUS ACADEMICI, ET OMNIUM ALICUJUS GRADUS LAUREA EXORNATORUM, IN COLLEGIO DARTMUTHENSI, HANOVERAE, IN REPUBLICA NEO-HANTONIENSI

By (Darthmouth College)

[Hanover, New Hampshire], 1843.. 1843.. Very good. - sc Octavo, softcovers bound in printed tan wraps. The covers are heavily rubbed, and stained with pieces out from the head and tail of the spine. There is a 3 inch long split to the front joint with warping to the top of the front cover. 80 pages. There is some foxing to the first and last leaves with some light dampstaining and a tiny tear to the front edge of the first few leaves. The page corners are creased. Otherwise the contents are very good. <p>From the library of the Rev. Walter Harris, D.D. of Dunbarton, N.H., signed by him on the back cover. Walter Harris was the first pastor of the Congregationalists in Dunbarton, N.H.<p>A catalogue listing the Presidents and faculty as well as the alumni of Darthmouth College from 1763 to 1843.<p>SCARCE.

$50.00

SPEECH OF HIRAM KETCHUM, ESQ. before a Committee of the Senate of the State of New-York, in relation to the public schools of the City of New-York, and in reply to the report of the Hon. John C. Spencer, superintendent of common schools, on the same subject

By Ketchum, Hiram

New-York, 1841.. 1841.. Very good. - Octavo, softcover, bound in printed self-wraps. The covers are soiled and darkened with some chipping to the edges. 16 pages. A very good unopened copy of this pamphlet. <p>First edition of this speech in support of the Roman Catholic Church's objections to public education.<p>Compulsory school attendance did not become the law in New York until 1853.

$25.00

EDUCATION AND THE IDEA OF MANKIND. Edited by Robert Ulich. Under the Auspices of the Council for the Study of Mankind

By Ulich, Robert; editor

New York: Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. (1964).. (1964).. Good. SIGNED BY ROBERT ULICH - Octavo, black cloth titled in gilt on the spine in a pictorial black dust wrapper. The covers are slightly bumped and rubbed at the extremities. The price-clipped dust jacket is heavily dampstained. 279 pages. Very good in a fair dw. <p>First edition. Inscribed and signed "Robert" by Robert Ulich on the front endpaper.<p>"A nation transmits its ideology to new generations through its schools. In the opinion of the educators represented here, the interdependence of nations today demands that this ideology be broad enough to include those universal values common to mankind as a whole...." -- Excerpted from the dw blurb.<p>Includes essays by Robert Ulich, John R. Seeley, George N. Shuster, Barbara Biber, John I. Goodlad, Earl S. Johnson, Horace M. Kallen, Paul F. Brandwein, Anne Roe, and Van Metes Ames.

$10.00

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