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A CORRESPONDENCE consisting of 4 AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED by the Famous French Priest HYACINTHE LOYSON [PERE HYACINTHE] who was excommunicated by the Catholic Church for his opposition to the pronouncements of the First Vatican Council.
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A CORRESPONDENCE consisting of 4 AUTOGRAPH LETTERS SIGNED by the Famous French Priest HYACINTHE LOYSON [PERE HYACINTHE] who was excommunicated by the Catholic Church for his opposition to the pronouncements of the First Vatican Council.

By Loyson, Hyacinthe [Charles Jean Marie Loyson (1827-1912)]. Famous French Preacher Pere Hyacinthe known for his eloquent sermons at Notre Dame. Pere Hyacinthe was excommunicated by the Catholic Church over his opposition to the First Vatican Council.

Neuilly pres Paris and Washington, D.C. 1883 through 1887. [1883]., [1883].. Very good. - A correspondence consisting of 4 Autograph Letters Signed by the French Priest Hyacinthe Loyson addressed to the American author and Presbyterian clergyman Henry Martin Field. In his first letter, penned from Neuily near Paris on July 24, 1883, Loyson addresses the Reverend Field as "Cher Monsieur et ami". This 8-1/8 inch high by 5-1/8 inch wide 4-page letter is penned on 4 sides of a folded sheet. Father Hyacinthe expresses his intention to visit and speak in the U.S. as so many have requested, though he makes clear that he will travel to the States only if certain conditions can be met. He requests that a committee composed of distinguished representatives of various churches and religious denominations formally request his visit. He's also concerned that they should be able to cover his expenses as he finds himself nearly destitute at the moment. "Vous savez deja par Madame Loyson le projet que j'ai fait d'aller en Amerique vers le moi d'octobre prochain. En me rendant au desir qui a ete si souvent exprime par nos amis, je dois cependant mettre deux conditions. La premiere, qu'il se forme aux Etats-Unis un comite compose d'hommes distingues de diverses Eglises, et qu'un appel formel er public me soit addresse par ce comite...." He emphasizes that he will present himself as he is, a Catholic who firmly believes in the great tradition of the past but who desires to see radical reform take place in the Roman Catholic Church and extends a hand to all Christian denominations. Signed "Hyacinthe Loyson / pretre".Now in the U.S., Loyson writes to Reverend Field from Washington, D.C. on November 5th, 1883. In this 8-1/4 inch high by 5-1/4 inch wide 3-page letter penned on 3 sides of a folded sheet, Loyson writes in response to Field's telegram to his wife Madame Loyson. Loyson writes that his lecture will be about the march of civilization in France and America, "Mon premier discours aura pour titre: la Marche de la Civilisation", but goes on to say that he has come down with a bad cold and, if possible, would prefer to reschedule his New York appearance to the 18th. However he would be willing to appear as scheduled if needed: "Si toutefois vous penser qu'il faut battre le fer pendent qu'il est chaud ... je vous laisse libre de le faire. Je me soignerai et je me preparerai de maniere a pouvoir parler ce jour la...." Loyson goes on to say that he is looking forward to meeting the reverend Field's brother, Dudley Field, and how he enjoyed his conversation with the Reverend's other brother, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Johnson Field: "J'ai eu avec votre autre frere, Juge a la Cour Supreme, une conversation qui m'a vivement interesse". Signed "Hyacinthe Loyson".Several years later, on October 11, 1887, Hyacinthe Loyson writes to the Reverend Field from "Parc de Neuilly, pres Paris". On his 8-3/8 inch high by 5-1/2 inch wide stationery penned on 3 sides of a folded sheet with his address printed at the top, Loyson writes a letter of recommendation for the Reverend Dr. MacKay: "Je vous adresse, avec les plus chaleureuses recommendations, le Reverend Dr. MacKay, ancien chapelain Anglican de l'avenue de Marbeuf et assistant du Reverend Docteur Morgan, a l'eglise americaine de l'avenue de l'Alma". Loyson goes on to state that the Reverend MacKay has left his position and, one assumes from the content, is likely moving to the U.S. where he intends to further the work which both Loyson and Field have been pursuing. "Vous la connaisser peut-etre moins que lui, n'ayant pas en occasion de la voir d'aussi pres, mais vous l'aimer autant...." Loyson asks if, in the name of their friendship, the Reverend Field might be able to open doors for the Reverend MacKay which would otherwise be closed to him. Signed "Tuus in Christo / Hyacinthe Loyson".A fourth letter, 8-1/4 inches high by 5-1/4 inches wide, penned on 3 sides of a folded sheet of cream paper with a black mourning border framing each page dives right in, without salutation or date, by quoting from Charles de Montalembert's "L'Espagne et la Liberte". "Le jour ou, dans l'ordre politique, la royaute, avec l'aide de l'inquisition, a tout absorbe, tout ecrase; le jour ou l'Eglise victorieuse a voulu abuser de la victoire, exclure et proscrire d'abord les Juifs, puis les Maures, puis les Protestants, puis toute discussion, tout examen, toute recherce, toute initiative, toute liberte, ce jour-la tout a ete perdu" [The day when, political order, royalty, with the aid of the inquisition, absorbed all, crushed all; that day when the victorious church chose to abuse its victory, exclude and proscribe first the Jews, then the Moors, then the Protestants, then all discussion, all examination, all initiative, all liberty, that day all was lost]. Loyson writes that those lines sum up the last work by one of the most illustrious Roman Catholics of his time. Montalembert's work was to be published in "Le Correspondant" (a French Catholic journal whose motto was "Civil and religious liberty throughout the universe"), but Montalembert's timid friends did not follow through. Loyson writes that he subsequently succeeded in having the work printed in the Swiss journal "La Bibliotheque Universelle et Revue Suisse" in 1876. He then notes that the library and review's director Edouard Tallichet has written a book about the process of getting this work by de Montalembert published. [Tallichet's book, titled "M. de Montalembert et le Père Hyacinthe: Histoire du Procès Intenté par la Famille de Montalembert au Père Hyacinthe et la Bibliothèque Universelle", is available as an ebook]. Penned before the prior letter, this autograph letter is dated from Reuilly-sur-Seine on May 14th, 1887 and signed "Hyacinthe Loyson" at the bottom of the third page.As mentioned by Pere Hyacinthe, some of the Reverend Field's correspondence with Loyson was addressed to Loyson's wife, the former Emilie Jane Butterfield Meriman, widow of the American Edwin Ruthven Meriman. Included with the correspondence is Madame Hyacinthe Loyson's calling card.Folded for mailing, the letters are in very good condition with but minor soiling and a minor chip or two to the edges of the October 1887 letter. Born in Orleans Charles Jean Marie Loyson (1827-1912), better known by his religious name Pere Hyacinthe and later Hyacinthe Loyson was a Roman Catholic priest of the Sulpician and Dominican orders before becoming a Discalced Carmelite. Loyson built his reputation as the most effective orator of his day preaching in Lyon and Bordeaux and subsequently gained fame for his sermons and orations at the Eglise de la Madeleine and at Notre Dame de Paris. He was summoned to Rome in 1868 because of his unorthodoxy and passion for controversial subjects. He was again censured for his address before the Ligue International de la Paix equating the Jewish religion, the Catholic religion and the Protestant religion as being the three great religions. The Roman Catholic Church subsequently excommunicated the fiery young priest following his protest against the manner in which the First Vatican Council was convened and his manifesto against the "sacrilegious perversion of the Gospel" and the abuses of the Church. During a brief stay in New York City, he was wooed by various Protestant sects but reaffirmed that he had no intentions of moving away from his Catholic faith. He allied himself with Ignaz von Dollinger's protest against Papal infallibility which had been defined as dogma by the First Vatican Council. Invited by the "Old Catholics" to lecture in Geneva, he advocated for church reform and the establishment of a national Christian Church in each country. Elected by liberal Catholics to the priesthood of a vacant parish, he introduced reforms in worship. Settling in Paris in 1877, Loyson drew upon the tradition of Gallicanism and established his "Eglise gallicane" as a separate church founded as an Anglican Communion denomination in the Old Catholic tradition.The American author and clergyman Henry Martin Field (1822-1907) was a Presbyterian minister and the editor and proprietor of the New York based periodical "The Evangelist". He was a pastor in St. Louis, Missouri and later in West Springfield, Massachusetts, spending some of his time in Europe between his appointments. Reverend Field authored several books on travel, including "From the Lakes of Killarney to the Golden Horn" and "From Egypt to Japan" as well as historical and religious works including "The Irish Confederates and the Rebellion of 1798", "On the Desert - Recent Events in Egypt", "Old Spain and New Spain", etc. Among his brothers were Supreme Court Justice Stephen Johnson Field, Cyrus West Field and David Dudley Field II. Field appeared as a character in the novel penned by his descendant Rachel Field "All This and Heaven Too" a novelization based on events in the life of Field's wife, the former Mlle. Henrietta Deluzy-Deportes who was at one time Governess to the Duc de Praslin and implicated in the Duc's murder of his wife Fanny. The events contributed to the turmoil which led to the overthrow of King Louis Philippe in 1848.Defender of the Freedom of the Press, Charles Forbes Rene, comte de Montalembert (1810-1870) was a journalist, historian, and proponent of liberal Catholicism. Montalembert was the author of several works throughout his life including "L'Espagne et la Liberte" inspired by the events of the Spanish Revolution of 1868.

$750.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the progressive rabbi STEPHEN SAMUEL WISE, an early supporter of Zionism who started the \
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the progressive rabbi STEPHEN SAMUEL WISE, an early supporter of Zionism who started the "Free Synagogue" movement, thanking James B. Pond for sending him passes for tickets to Maeterlinck's first American lecture.

By Wise, Stephen Samuel (1874-1949). American Progressive Era, Reform rabbi and Zionist leader who started the "Free Synagogue" movement, served as president of the American Jewish Congress and co-founded the NAACP.

New York, December 31, 1919., 1919.. Very good. - Over 70 words typed on his 6 inch high by 8 inch wide buff "Free Synagogue / New York" stationery. Stephen Samuel Wise thanks the American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond for "sending the passes for the tickets" to Maurice Maeterlinck first lecture in America. Wise writes "I shall be a little late, because of a lecture of my own...." He further inquires if "I might have had two tickets for the other Maeterlinck recital on the 7th...." Signed "Stephen S. Wise". Folded for mailing. Very good. Born in Budapest, Stephen Samuel Wise (1874-1949) emigrated to the US when his father accepted service as rabbi of Brooklyn's Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes. After completing his studies at Columbia University, Wise pursued rabbinical studies under several noted rabbis of the era, including Richard J.H. Gottheil, Kohut, Gersoni, Joffe, and Margolis. He was appointed assistant rabbi of NYC's Congregation B'nai Jeshurun becoming the Congregation's senior rabbi later that year. Taking over as rabbi of Portland, Oregon's Congregation Beth Israel, he attacked many of the social and political ills facing the country. He soon broke with the traditional reform movement and established his "Free Synagogue" in 1907, launching a movement. Wise was an early supporter of Zionism and laid the groundwork for what became the Zionist Organization of America and served as president of the American Jewish Congress. His good friend Albert Einstein profoundly praised him in a tribute that Einstein presented at the celebration of Wise' 60th birthday. In 1914, Wise co-founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Wise, early on, saw the threat posed by Hitler's rise in Germany and fought to shape U.S. public opinion against the growing German threat, leading efforts for a Jewish Boycott of Germany and the creation of the World Jewish Congress.James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides.

$125.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the progressive rabbi STEPHEN SAMUEL WISE, an early supporter of Zionism who started the \
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the progressive rabbi STEPHEN SAMUEL WISE, an early supporter of Zionism who started the "Free Synagogue" movement, in reply to James B. Pond's invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck's first American lecture.

By Wise, Stephen Samuel (1874-1949). American Progressive Era, Reform rabbi and Zionist leader who started the "Free Synagogue" movement, served as president of the American Jewish Congress and co-founded the NAACP.

New York, December 11, 1919., 1919.. Very good. - Over 30 words typed on his 6 inch high by 8 inch wide buff "Free Synagogue / New York" stationery. Stephen Samuel Wise is pleased to accept American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond's invitation to serve on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America. Wise writes "I accept with much pleasure your kind invitation to serve as a member of the Honorary Reception Committee...." Signed "Stephen S. Wise". Folded for mailing, with a small piece out from the top left corner. Very good. Born in Budapest, Stephen Samuel Wise (1874-1949) emigrated to the US when his father accepted service as rabbi of Brooklyn's Congregation Baith Israel Anshei Emes. After completing his studies at Columbia University, Wise pursued rabbinical studies under several noted rabbis of the era, including Richard J.H. Gottheil, Kohut, Gersoni, Joff, and Margolis. He was appointed assistant rabbi of NYC's Congregation B'nai Jeshurun becoming the Congregation's senior rabbi later that year. Taking over as rabbi of Portland, Oregon's Congregation Beth Israel, he attacked many of the social and political ills facing the country. He soon broke with the traditional reform movement and established his "Free Synagogue" in 1907, launching a movement. Wise was an early supporter of Zionism and laid the groundwork for what became the Zionist Organization of America and served as president of the American Jewish Congress. His good friend Albert Einstein profoundly praised him in a tribute that Einstein presented at the celebration of Wise' 60th birthday. In 1914, Wise co-founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Wise, early on, saw the threat posed by Hitler's rise in Germany and fought to shape U.S. public opinion against the growing German threat, leading efforts for a Jewish Boycott of Germany and the creation of the World Jewish Congress.James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides.

$125.00

AUTOGRAPH of the English Congregational Theologian JOSEPH PARKER.
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AUTOGRAPH of the English Congregational Theologian JOSEPH PARKER.

By Parker, Joseph (1830-1902). English Congregational Theologian, best known as a temperance orator.

Circa [1880's]., [1880's].. Very good. - Joseph Parker's autograph penned on a 1-3/8 inch high by 2-7/8 inch wide slip of paper mounted onto a 1-5/8 inch high by 3-3/8 inch wide piece of paper cut from an autograph album. There are minor glue stains which do not affect the signature. Very good. In the years from 1845-1850, Joseph Parker [1830-1902] was already gaining a reputation as a young preacher and temperance orator. After entering the Congregational ministry and serving as a pastor in London, Banbury and Manchester, and making a name for himself as a power in English Nonconformity, he returned to London in 1869 as minister of the Poultry church, founded by Thomas Goodwin. There he began a scheme to erect the great City Temple in Holborn Viaduct, which opened in May 1874. From this center his influence spread far and wide. His stimulating and original sermons, delivered with a ready command of vigorous English, made him one of the best known personalities of his time.

$20.00

AUTOGRAPH of the Nineteenth Century Baptist minister JOHN STOCK, LLD.
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AUTOGRAPH of the Nineteenth Century Baptist minister JOHN STOCK, LLD.

By Stock, John LLD (1817-1884). Minister who published 40 tracts in the "Baptist Tract and Book Society".

Circa [1870's]., [1870's].. Very good. - John Stock LLD's autograph penned on a 1-3/8 inch high by 2-7/8 inch wide slip of paper mounted onto a 1-5/8 inch high by 3-1/4 inch wide piece of paper cut from an autograph album. There are some light glue stains which do not affect the signature. Very good. John Stock LLD (1817-1884) was minister of the Salendine Nook Chapel of Huddersfield. He published 40 tracts in the "Baptist Tract and Books Society".

$10.00

AUTOGRAPH of 19th Century Baptist Minister and Bibliophile SAMUEL GOSNELL GREEN.
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AUTOGRAPH of 19th Century Baptist Minister and Bibliophile SAMUEL GOSNELL GREEN.

By Green, Samuel Gosnell (1822-1905). Baptist minister, editor of the Religious Tract Society and author of the "Handbook to the Grammar of the Greek Testament".

Circa [1880's]., [1880's].. Very good. - Samuel Gosnell Green's autograph penned on a 1-3/8 inch high by 2-7/8 inch wide slip of paper mounted onto a 1-5/8 inch high by 3-3/8 inch wide slip of paper clipped from an autograph album. Very good. The Baptist minister and bibliophile Samuel Gosnell Green (1822-1905) first worked in the printing office of John Haddon in Finsbury before entering college to prepare for the ministry. He was the classical and mathematical tutor at Horton College (now Rawdon College) and was connected with the Sunday School Union where he edited the monthly "Notes on Lessons". He wrote several religious children's books. Moving to London in 1876, he served as editor and then editorial secretary of the Religious Tract Society. He published several works, the most significant being his "Handbook to the Grammar of the Greek Testament" which he first published in 1870.

$20.00

A SERMON DELIVERED AT THE INTERMENT OF THE REV. JONATHAN MURDOCK, Pastor of the Church in Borrah, Who Departed This Life, Jan. 17, 1812, in the 67th Year of His Age.
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A SERMON DELIVERED AT THE INTERMENT OF THE REV. JONATHAN MURDOCK, Pastor of the Church in Borrah, Who Departed This Life, Jan. 17, 1812, in the 67th Year of His Age.

By Strong, Joseph, D.D.; Pastor of the First Church in Norwich.

Norwich: printed by Russell Hubbard, 1813., 1813.. Good. - Octavo, bound in early homemade wrappers with a blue pencil title on the front cover. The wraps are rubbed, soiled & chipped with heavy creasing to the corners. 18 pages. The corners of the pamphlet are creased & there is scattered foxing. Good. First edition.

$50.00

SERMON OF IMMORTAL LIFE Preached at the Melodeon, On Sunday September 20th, 1846 / by Theodore Parker, Minister of the XXVIII Congregational Church in Boston, and now published by request.
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SERMON OF IMMORTAL LIFE Preached at the Melodeon, On Sunday September 20th, 1846 / by Theodore Parker, Minister of the XXVIII Congregational Church in Boston, and now published by request.

By Parker, Theodore.

Boston, MA: Jordan & Wiley, 1846., 1846.. Fair. - Octavo, softcover bound in tan printed wrappers with cream cord. The rear wrapper is lacking.The binding is chipped & creased. 32 pages. The pages are creased & bumped with dampstaining to their bottom front corners. Good reading copy. First edition.The title pages states that the pamphlet was printed by George Coolidge.Theodore Parker [1810-1860] was an American Transcendentalist and minister of the Unitarian church. A reformer and an abolitionist, his words and popular quotations would later inspire speeches by Abraham Lincoln and Martin Luther King, Jr. In 1845 a sizable group of Parker's supporters resolved to provide him with an opportunity to be heard in Boston. Despite misgivings, Parker accepted and preached his first sermon at the Melodeon theatre in February of that year. Although this was supposed to be a temporary arrangement, Parker resigned his pastorate in West Roxbury in early 1846. He elected to call his new congregation the 28th Congregational Society of Boston. His congregation grew to 2,000 and included such influential figures as Louisa May Alcott, William Lloyd Garrison, Julia Ward Howe and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Parker worked with fugitive slaves, some of whom were in his congregation, and hid them in his house. He was indicted for his actions, but was never convicted.

$50.00

A HISTORICAL DISCOURSE, DELIVERED AT CHELSEA, MASS., SEPT. 20, 1866. AT THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE WINNISIMMET CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.
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A HISTORICAL DISCOURSE, DELIVERED AT CHELSEA, MASS., SEPT. 20, 1866. AT THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE WINNISIMMET CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.

By Langworthy, Isaac P.

Chelsea, MA: Winnisimmet Congregational Church, 1866., 1866.. Good. - Octavo, softcover bound in printed tan wrappers. The back strip is chipped. The wraps are soiled & darkened with the corners creased. 47 pages. 1 full-page black-and-white illustration. Good. As the former first pastor of the church, Isaac P. Langworthy was invited to deliver the address on the 25th anniversary of its founding in 1841.

$20.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY THE SCOTTISH CONGREGATIONALIST MISSIONARY TO AFRICA ROBERT MOFFAT, FATHER-IN-LAW OF DAVID LIVINGSTONE.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY THE SCOTTISH CONGREGATIONALIST MISSIONARY TO AFRICA ROBERT MOFFAT, FATHER-IN-LAW OF DAVID LIVINGSTONE.

By Moffat, Robert. (1795-1883). Scottish Congregationalist missionary to Africa, father-in-law of David Livingstone, of Stanley and Livingstone fame, and translator of the Bible into Setswana.

Buxton, Surrey, U.K.: February 3, 1874., 1874.. Good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling a 5-1/4 inch high by 3-1/2 inch wide sheet of cream-colored paper which has been mounted on a blue stiff paper sheet of the same size. Signed "Robert Moffat". The top & bottom edges of the letter are darkened from offsetting by the glue used in the mounting. Good. The letter is addressed to a Mr. Friendship. Moffat writes that it is with great pleasure that he sends his correspondent his autograph. "I regret that it is not in my power to supply you with one of Livingstone, but may be able to do so by & bye, & have therefore retained your envelope & address." David Livingstone [1813-1873] was the explorer and missionary of Stanley and Livingstone fame and was married to Moffat's eldest daughter Mary.The Scottish Congregationalist missionary to Africa Robert Moffat (1795-1883) worked as a gardener before applying to the London Missionary Society to work as an overseas missionary. In the interim, he met his future wife while working at a plantation farm in Dukinfield. Commissioned as a missionary at Surrey Chapel he was sent out to South Africa, his fiancee joining him three years later in Cape Town. Together, they settled at Kuruman among the Batswana people [Botswana as it later came to be known, was then still part of South Africa] where they worked passionately for the missionary cause. Both endured hardships and Moffat, who frequently journeyed into neighboring regions, often bound his stomach to endure fasting when he could not find food. He sent reports of his journeys to the Royal Geographical Society and, during a visit to England, published an account of his family's experiences, "Missionary Labours and Scenes in South Africa". Moffat translated the Bible and "The Pilgrim's Progress" into Setswana.

$200.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY LYMAN ABBOTT, CONGREGATIONALIST THEOLOGIAN AND EDITOR OF THE OUTLOOK WEEKLY.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY LYMAN ABBOTT, CONGREGATIONALIST THEOLOGIAN AND EDITOR OF THE OUTLOOK WEEKLY.

By Abbott, Lyman. (1835-1922). American Congregationalist theologian, editor and author.

Charlottesville, VA: April 29, 1901., 1901.. Good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling 1-3/4 sides of an 8-3/4 inch high by 5 inch wide cream-colored sheet of University of Virginia letterhead. Signed "Lyman Abbott". There is some offsetting to the letter. The right edge of the letterhead is wrinkled, probably from humidity, with a paper-clip mark to the top edge. There is a small stain in the left margin. Good. Abbott, as editor of The Outlook, writes that he doubts whether the literary material a correspondent has inquired about has any market value, but suggests he try sending it to the N.Y. Times Literary Supplement. He also says he has forwarded the inquiry to Henry Ward Beecher's publishers who will contact him if they think the material has value.Lyman Abbott [1835-1922] was an American Congregationalist theologian, editor and author. He was ordained a minister of the Congregational Church in 1860. He was pastor of the Congregational Church in Terre Haute, Indiana until 1865 and of the New England Church in New York City from 1865-68. He founded the Illustrated Christian Weekly and edited it for six years. He co-edited with Henry Ward Beecher the non-denominational religious weekly The Christian Union [renamed The Outlook in 1893]. In 1888 he succeeded Beecher as pastor of Plymouth Church, Brooklyn. He also wrote Beecher's official biography and edited his papers. From 1881 until his death Abbott was editor-in-chief of The Outlook. He was a constant advocate of social reform and promulgated the Social Gospel, applying Christianity to social and industrial problems.

$50.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY THE REV. GEORGE HILL, PASTOR OF THE LEEDS, SOUTH PARADE BAPTIST CHURCH, SENDING THANKS FOR AN OFFER OF HELP WHICH HE CANNOT ACCEPT.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY THE REV. GEORGE HILL, PASTOR OF THE LEEDS, SOUTH PARADE BAPTIST CHURCH, SENDING THANKS FOR AN OFFER OF HELP WHICH HE CANNOT ACCEPT.

By Hill, Rev. George. Pastor of the Leeds, South Parade Baptist Church (1877--1891).

Leeds: September 24, 1878., 1878.. Fine. - Letter penned in black ink & filling both sides of a sheet of 6-7/8 inch high by 4-1/2 inch wide cream-colored note paper. Signed " Geo. Hill". Folded once for mailing. Fine <p>Hill writes to a Mr. W. Friendship [?] about venues for [Baptist] Union Meetings. "We are very much obliged for your offer of help, of which however we fear we cannot avail ourselves as we understand alterations will be made in the train arrangements next month which will make it impossible for Delegates to be sent to Otley and Ilkley.<p>The historic Leeds, South Parade Church may properly be described as the mother of the Baptist churches of the city. After John Wesley visited Leeds in 1743 and declared that "No man cared for the things of God", a group of Methodists in the city built St. Peter's Chapel. One of their preachers, John Edwards, seceded from the Methodists and founded the first Congregational Church in Leeds. Some of his followers walked to Bradford to hear the Rev. William Crabtree preach and were received into the Bradford Church. At length it was decided to adopt the Baptist cause in Leeds and in 1779 part of the Old Assembly Rooms in Kirkgate was opened for public worship. Dr. Fawcett of Hebden Bridge preached the first sermon. George Hill was pastor of the church from 1877 to 1891, succeeding the Rev. William Best, during whose ministry Baptist work began at Burley Road and Beeston Hill.

$35.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY THE REV. DONALD SAGE MACKAY, PASTOR OF ST. NICHOLAS COLLEGIATE CHURCH, THANKING MAJOR POND FOR LECTURE TICKETS AND PRAISING POND\'S BOOK.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY THE REV. DONALD SAGE MACKAY, PASTOR OF ST. NICHOLAS COLLEGIATE CHURCH, THANKING MAJOR POND FOR LECTURE TICKETS AND PRAISING POND'S BOOK.

By Mackay, Rev. Donald Sage. (1863-1908). Minister in St. Albans, Vermont, and from 1900-1908 pastor of St. Nicholas Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, New York City.

New York: January 2, 1902., 1902.. Very good. - 109 words typed on a cream-colored 10-1/8 inch high by 8 inch wide sheet of The Collegiate Church letterhead with the address and a coat of arms printed at the top. Signed "Donald Sage Mackay". The edges of the letter are slightly darkened & lightly creased with a tiny ink mark at top left. Folded 3 times for mailing. Very good. Mackay writes to Major J. B. Pond of the Pond Lecture Bureau, New York City, thanking him for giving his family the opportunity to hear a lecture the previous day. He adds; "I have never told you, but one of the most delightful books which I read last summer was your "Eccentricities of Genius". It is a charming volume, and you did well to publish it. The side lights which it casts upon the characters of well known men are strikingly suggestive".Born in Scotland, Donald Sage Mackay [1863-1908] graduated as a lawyer from the University of Glasgow but found a calling to be a minister. Visiting America in 1889 with a letter of introduction to the Governor of Vermont, he was invited to become the pastor of the First Congregational Church in St. Alban's. After five years in St. Alban's and another five years as pastor of the North Reformed Church in Newark, N.J. Mackay had gained a reputation as a charismatic preacher and community leader. In 1900 he was invited to become pastor of St. Nicholas Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in New York City. He remained there for the last eight years of his life. President Theodore Roosevelt attended the church when he was in New York City. Mackay died of pneumonia at the youthful age of 44.

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY THE REV. DONALD SAGE MACKAY, PASTOR OF ST. NICHOLAS COLLEGIATE CHURCH, THANKING MAJOR J. B. POND FOR HIS GENEROSITY.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY THE REV. DONALD SAGE MACKAY, PASTOR OF ST. NICHOLAS COLLEGIATE CHURCH, THANKING MAJOR J. B. POND FOR HIS GENEROSITY.

By Mackay, Rev. Donald Sage. (1863-1908). Minister in St. Albans, Vermont, and from 1900-1908 pastor of St. Nicholas Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church, New York City.

New York: December 8, 1900., 1900.. Good. - 37 words penned in black ink on a cream sheet of lettterhead folded once to form 4 sides, each approximately 6-3/4 inches high by 4-3/8 inches high. A raised symbol is printed in silver on the first side at top left. Signed "Donald Sage Mackay". There are some very light glue marks to the lower half of the letter with a light diagonal crease to the paper at top left. Good. Mackay writes to Major J. B. Pond of the Pond Lecture Bureau, New York City, thanking him and his wife for their generosity. "How kind you are! Mrs. Mackay and I owe you and Mrs. Pond a deep debt of gratitude for this fresh token of your generosity."Born in Scotland, Donald Sage Mackay [1863-1908] graduated as a lawyer from the University of Glasgow but found a calling to be a minister. Visiting America in 1889 with a letter of introduction to the Governor of Vermont, he was invited to become the pastor of the First Congregational Church in St. Alban's. After five years in St. Alban's and another five years as pastor of the North Reformed Church in Newark, N.J. Mackay had gained a reputation as a charismatic preacher and community leader. In 1900 he was invited to become pastor of St. Nicholas Collegiate Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in New York City. He remained there for the last eight years of his life. President Theodore Roosevelt attended the church when he was in New York City. Mackay died of pneumonia at the youthful age of 44.

$75.00

THE THAT PHANOM CHRONICLE: A SHRINE HISTORY AND ITS INTERPRETATION. Edited and Translated by James B. Pruess. Data paper : Number 104. Southeast Asia Program, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University.

By Pruess, James B., editor.

Ithaca, New York: Cornell University, November 1976., 1976.. Very good. - Quarto, 10-7/8 inches high by 8-1/2 inches wide. Softcover, bound in printed red wrappers. x & 86 pages including a list of Cornell University Southeast Asia Program publications. Illustrated with a full page map. There is a crease to the rear wrapper. Very good. <p>"James B. Pruess's edition of The That Phanom Chronicle, presented in this volume gives us an important example of Buddhist historiography. In the course of introducing this work, Pruess also contributed notably to our understanding of the historical consciousness of the Lao and (now) Thai-Lao of the Middle Mekong Valley, for whom the shrine of the Buddha's Breast-bone Telic at That Phanom long has served as a symbol of their identity.<p>"This translation of the That Phanom shrine chronicle is an indirect product of field research on contemporary Theravade Buddhist pilgrimage in Thailand...." - from the author's preface.

$15.00

THE GIST OF SWEDENBORG.

By Smyth, Julian K.; and Wunsch, William F. (compilers).

Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, (1920)., (1920).. Very good. - Octavo, 7-1/8 inches high by 4-5/8 inches wide. Burgundy cloth with titled paper labels on the front cover and the spine. The corners are bumped and the spine label is darkened & stained. 110 pages. An attractive bookplate of Patti Broadhurst depicting seagulls flying over a sail boat is mounted on the front pastedown. Very good. <p>Published for the Iungerich foundation: "This book is published by the Trustees of the Iungerich Publication Fund which was created by the late L.C Iungerich of Philadelphia".

$20.00

LA BIBBIA (L'ANTICO E IL NUOVO TESTAMENTO). Gli Agiografi (Ketubim): Cronache, Ezra, Nehemiah.
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LA BIBBIA (L'ANTICO E IL NUOVO TESTAMENTO). Gli Agiografi (Ketubim): Cronache, Ezra, Nehemiah.

By Luzzi, Giovanni; translator and annotator.

Firenze [Italy]: G. C. Sansoni Editore, [1923]., [1923].. Good. - Octavo, softcover bound in tan pictorial wrappers with an illustration in brown on the front cover. There is white spotting & light soiling to the binding with a small brown stain to the front cover. The bottom edge of the front cover & the tail of the spine are creased. 304 pages, unopened. Illustrated with 2 black-and-white maps, 1 folding color map & 8 black-and-white plates. Good. <p>This volume includes Chronicles 1 and 2, Ezra and Nehemiah translated into Italian from the original texts and annotated with an introduction by Giovanni Luzzi. The maps are of the Temple of Solomon, Jerusalem and the Walls of Jerusalem.

$35.00

A COLLECTION OF EASTERN STORIES AND LEGENDS: For Narration or Later Reading in Schools.
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A COLLECTION OF EASTERN STORIES AND LEGENDS: For Narration or Later Reading in Schools.

By Shedlock, Marie L.; compiler and adapter.

London: George Routledge & Sons, Limited / New York: E. P. Dutton and Co., 1910., 1910.. Very good.. - Octavo, pictorial red cloth titled in gilt on the spine with an illustration of a tree within a decorative frame in black on the front cover. The corners of the covers and the head & tail of the spine are lightly rubbed. The cloth is slightly bubbled along the bottom edge of the front cover. The front endpaper & the verso of the frontispiece are lightly foxed. xvi & 141 pages plus colophon & 2-page publisher's catalog. Black-and-white frontispiece by Wolfram Onslow Ford reproducing the cover illustration. A few bottom page corners are lightly creased. Very good. <p>First edition.<p>A collection of stories of the Buddha with an introduction by Professor T. W. Rhys Davids. A small figure of the Buddha appears in the illustration's decorative frame.

$50.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO THE MAJOR JAMES B. POND OF THE POND LECTURE BUREAU SIGNED BY ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL THEOLOGIAN JOSEPH PARKER.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO THE MAJOR JAMES B. POND OF THE POND LECTURE BUREAU SIGNED BY ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL THEOLOGIAN JOSEPH PARKER.

By Parker, Joseph. (1830-1902). English Congregational Theologian.

Bridgeport, CT: October 11, 1887., 1887.. Good. - 42 words penned on the upper half of an approximately 9 inch high by 5-1/2 inch wide sheet of cream paper. Signed "Joseph Parker". The paper is darkened around the edges. There are 2 chips to the right edge & a small piece out of the top edge. A red stamp indicating the letter has been answered affects the top left corner of the text without making it illegible. Folded 3 times for mailing. Good. <p>Parker writes to his manager Major James B. Pond announcing his arrival in Bridgeport, Conn. and his plans to reach Everett House, Pond's residence, in time for lunch at 1 p.m. on Wednesday. "Then we rest. Then we go to Mrs. Beecher's arriving about 5.30. You can warn Everett Ho[use] of the approach of two comets." Parker has arrived in the US. to deliver a eulogy on Henry Ward Beecher, who was a close friend.<p>Accompanying this letter is a copy, typed by Pond, of an affectionate letter written to him by Parker the day before Parker's departure for England, in which Parker jokingly but firmly refuses payment for this engagement. Pond notes that he presented Parker with a check for $1,100 which Parker immediately tore up in front of him.<p>In the years from 1845-1850, Joseph Parker [1830-1902] was already gaining a reputation as a young preacher and temperance orator. After entering the Congregational ministry and serving as a pastor in London, Banbury and Manchester, and making a name for himself as a power in English Nonconformity, he returned to London in 1869 as minister of the Poultry church, founded by Thomas Goodwin. There he began a scheme to erect the great City Temple in Holborn Viaduct, which opened in May 1874. From this center his influence spread far and wide. His stimulating and original sermons, delivered with a ready command of vigorous English, made him one of the best known personalities of his time.

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY NONCONFORMIST MINISTER WILLIAM MORLEY PUNSHON.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY NONCONFORMIST MINISTER WILLIAM MORLEY PUNSHON.

By Punshon, William Morley. (1824-1881). English nonconformist minister who settled in Canada. His sermons drew huge crowds in Canada and the U.S.

London: January 14th, 1878.. 1878.. Very good. - 17 words penned in black ink on a cream-colored, 7 inch high by 4-3/8 inch wide sheet of his letterhead with his address printed at the top. The letter has been tipped onto a sheet of pink paper approximately 8-3/4 inches high by 7 inches wide. Signed "W. Morley Punshon". `The left edge of the mount is faded and both the letter & the pink paper are lightly rippled from the mounting. Very good. <p>Punshon writes to a Mr. Frendship: "I am quite unable to take any additional engagements. I am embarrased by the number I have".<p>William Morley Punshon [1824-1881] was an English nonconformist minister. Ordained in Manchester in 1849, he went to Chicago as the representative of the Wesleyan Methodist conference. He subsequently settled in Canada and did much to advance the cause of his denomination. His preaching and lectures drew great crowds both in Canada and the United States and he was five times president of the Canadian conference. He also restored the fortunes of the flagging Victoria college in Cobourg, Ontario [now Victoria University] and created the great Metropolitan Methodist Church in downtown Toronto [now Metropolitan United Church].

$75.00

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