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THE THAT PHANOM CHRONICLE: A SHRINE HISTORY AND ITS INTERPRETATION. Edited and Translated by James B. Pruess. Data paper : Number 104. Southeast Asia Program, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University.

By Pruess, James B., editor.

Ithaca, New York: Cornell University, November 1976., 1976.. Very good. - Quarto, 10-7/8 inches high by 8-1/2 inches wide. Softcover, bound in printed red wrappers. x & 86 pages including a list of Cornell University Southeast Asia Program publications. Illustrated with a full page map. There is a crease to the rear wrapper. Very good. <p>"James B. Pruess's edition of The That Phanom Chronicle, presented in this volume gives us an important example of Buddhist historiography. In the course of introducing this work, Pruess also contributed notably to our understanding of the historical consciousness of the Lao and (now) Thai-Lao of the Middle Mekong Valley, for whom the shrine of the Buddha's Breast-bone Telic at That Phanom long has served as a symbol of their identity.<p>"This translation of the That Phanom shrine chronicle is an indirect product of field research on contemporary Theravade Buddhist pilgrimage in Thailand...." - from the author's preface.

$15.00

THE GIST OF SWEDENBORG.

By Smyth, Julian K.; and Wunsch, William F. (compilers).

Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company, (1920)., (1920).. Very good. - Octavo, 7-1/8 inches high by 4-5/8 inches wide. Burgundy cloth with titled paper labels on the front cover and the spine. The corners are bumped and the spine label is darkened & stained. 110 pages. An attractive bookplate of Patti Broadhurst depicting seagulls flying over a sail boat is mounted on the front pastedown. Very good. <p>Published for the Iungerich foundation: "This book is published by the Trustees of the Iungerich Publication Fund which was created by the late L.C Iungerich of Philadelphia".

$20.00

LA BIBBIA (L'ANTICO E IL NUOVO TESTAMENTO). Gli Agiografi (Ketubim): Cronache, Ezra, Nehemiah.
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LA BIBBIA (L'ANTICO E IL NUOVO TESTAMENTO). Gli Agiografi (Ketubim): Cronache, Ezra, Nehemiah.

By Luzzi, Giovanni; translator and annotator.

Firenze [Italy]: G. C. Sansoni Editore, [1923]., [1923].. Good. - Octavo, softcover bound in tan pictorial wrappers with an illustration in brown on the front cover. There is white spotting & light soiling to the binding with a small brown stain to the front cover. The bottom edge of the front cover & the tail of the spine are creased. 304 pages, unopened. Illustrated with 2 black-and-white maps, 1 folding color map & 8 black-and-white plates. Good. <p>This volume includes Chronicles 1 and 2, Ezra and Nehemiah translated into Italian from the original texts and annotated with an introduction by Giovanni Luzzi. The maps are of the Temple of Solomon, Jerusalem and the Walls of Jerusalem.

$35.00

A COLLECTION OF EASTERN STORIES AND LEGENDS: For Narration or Later Reading in Schools.
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A COLLECTION OF EASTERN STORIES AND LEGENDS: For Narration or Later Reading in Schools.

By Shedlock, Marie L.; compiler and adapter.

London: George Routledge & Sons, Limited / New York: E. P. Dutton and Co., 1910., 1910.. Very good.. - Octavo, pictorial red cloth titled in gilt on the spine with an illustration of a tree within a decorative frame in black on the front cover. The corners of the covers and the head & tail of the spine are lightly rubbed. The cloth is slightly bubbled along the bottom edge of the front cover. The front endpaper & the verso of the frontispiece are lightly foxed. xvi & 141 pages plus colophon & 2-page publisher's catalog. Black-and-white frontispiece by Wolfram Onslow Ford reproducing the cover illustration. A few bottom page corners are lightly creased. Very good. <p>First edition.<p>A collection of stories of the Buddha with an introduction by Professor T. W. Rhys Davids. A small figure of the Buddha appears in the illustration's decorative frame.

$50.00

LA GIORNATA DEL CRISTIANO SANTIFICATA CON L'ORAZIONE E CON LA MEDITAZIONE. Tradotta ora la prima volta in Italiano dopo la trigesima terza edizione in Francese. (3 "books" bound in one).
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LA GIORNATA DEL CRISTIANO SANTIFICATA CON L'ORAZIONE E CON LA MEDITAZIONE. Tradotta ora la prima volta in Italiano dopo la trigesima terza edizione in Francese. (3 "books" bound in one).

By [Daily Missal].

Padova [Padua]: Nella Stamperia del Seminario, Appresso Giovanni Manfre, 1768., 1768.. Good. - 16mo, 5-3/8 inches high by 3-1/4 inches wide. Bound in full brown calf with gilt ruled raised bands and floral decorations on the spine and floral gilt decorated frames on the covers. The covers are rubbed and scuffed with wear to the edges and the spine is darkened. The leather is cracking along the length of the spine. The gilt along the three edges of the book has largely rubbed away. The first book of this missal, contained within these covers, is a complete work and is RARE. It collates thus: [18] unnumbered pages, followed by pages 1-341. The second book is a fragment of a different work containing pages 313-540 of that work. The third book contained within is an attractively penned 64 page manuscript, quite likely a copy of yet another work. It is signed with the initials "P.A.G." An attractive engraved vignette of the virgin Mary holding her child illustrates the title page of the first work. The hinges are cracking and the pink endpapers and pastedowns are stained and rubbed with evidence of early worming to the rear endpaper. The text block is intact but fragile. The pages are lightly darkened with occasional faint staining. Good. <p>Translated into Italian from the third French edition.<p>The Seminary's print shop was set up in 1684. In 1700, the new Bishop of Padua signed a contract with the young Venetian bookseller Giovanni Manfre who became the exclusive agent for the press. Thanks to Manfre's skills the printing company of the Padua Seminary became one of the most important in Italy. Giovanni Manfre died in 1743 and his son Marcantonio succeeded him in the business continuing to publish under his father's name.

$150.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO THE MAJOR JAMES B. POND OF THE POND LECTURE BUREAU SIGNED BY ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL THEOLOGIAN JOSEPH PARKER.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER TO THE MAJOR JAMES B. POND OF THE POND LECTURE BUREAU SIGNED BY ENGLISH CONGREGATIONAL THEOLOGIAN JOSEPH PARKER.

By Parker, Joseph. (1830-1902). English Congregational Theologian.

Bridgeport, CT: October 11, 1887., 1887.. Good. - 42 words penned on the upper half of an approximately 9 inch high by 5-1/2 inch wide sheet of cream paper. Signed "Joseph Parker". The paper is darkened around the edges. There are 2 chips to the right edge & a small piece out of the top edge. A red stamp indicating the letter has been answered affects the top left corner of the text without making it illegible. Folded 3 times for mailing. Good. <p>Parker writes to his manager Major James B. Pond announcing his arrival in Bridgeport, Conn. and his plans to reach Everett House, Pond's residence, in time for lunch at 1 p.m. on Wednesday. "Then we rest. Then we go to Mrs. Beecher's arriving about 5.30. You can warn Everett Ho[use] of the approach of two comets." Parker has arrived in the US. to deliver a eulogy on Henry Ward Beecher, who was a close friend.<p>Accompanying this letter is a copy, typed by Pond, of an affectionate letter written to him by Parker the day before Parker's departure for England, in which Parker jokingly but firmly refuses payment for this engagement. Pond notes that he presented Parker with a check for $1,100 which Parker immediately tore up in front of him.<p>In the years from 1845-1850, Joseph Parker [1830-1902] was already gaining a reputation as a young preacher and temperance orator. After entering the Congregational ministry and serving as a pastor in London, Banbury and Manchester, and making a name for himself as a power in English Nonconformity, he returned to London in 1869 as minister of the Poultry church, founded by Thomas Goodwin. There he began a scheme to erect the great City Temple in Holborn Viaduct, which opened in May 1874. From this center his influence spread far and wide. His stimulating and original sermons, delivered with a ready command of vigorous English, made him one of the best known personalities of his time.

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY BISHOP OF OXFORD AND OPPONENT OF EVOLUTION SAMUEL "SOAPY SAM" WILBERFORCE.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY BISHOP OF OXFORD AND OPPONENT OF EVOLUTION SAMUEL "SOAPY SAM" WILBERFORCE.

By Wilberforce. Samuel "Soapy Sam". (1805-1873). Bishop of Oxford.

Wheatley, Oxfordshire, U.K.: January 5, 1857., 1857.. Good. - Letter penned in black ink and filling just over 3 sides of a cream-colored sheet of his personal letterhead which is folded once to form 4 sides, each 7 inches high by 4-1/4 inches wide. The first side is bordered in black with the address of the bishop's residence, Cuddesdon Palace, at the top. Signed, as was typical with Anglican bishops, "Oxon". There are tears at the folds of the letter. There is a tiny chip to one top corner & a small crease to the other. Folded twice for mailing. Good. <p>The Bishop writes to the wife of Bishop [possibly Aubrey or George] Spencer, recommending Merton College, Oxford. He adds in a postscript: "You will be grieved to hear that Mrs. [Sargeant?] has met with a serious accident having fallen down & ruptured the main tendon of the knee. She is kept on her back in bed...."<p>Samuel "Soapy Sam" Wilberforce [1805-1873], Bishop of Oxford, was an opponent of evolution who participated in the 1860 Oxford debate with T. H. Huxley. His nickname was based on a comment by Benjamin Disraeli.

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY NONCONFORMIST MINISTER WILLIAM MORLEY PUNSHON.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY NONCONFORMIST MINISTER WILLIAM MORLEY PUNSHON.

By Punshon, William Morley. (1824-1881). English nonconformist minister who settled in Canada. His sermons drew huge crowds in Canada and the U.S.

London: January 14th, 1878.. 1878.. Very good. - 17 words penned in black ink on a cream-colored, 7 inch high by 4-3/8 inch wide sheet of his letterhead with his address printed at the top. The letter has been tipped onto a sheet of pink paper approximately 8-3/4 inches high by 7 inches wide. Signed "W. Morley Punshon". `The left edge of the mount is faded and both the letter & the pink paper are lightly rippled from the mounting. Very good. <p>Punshon writes to a Mr. Frendship: "I am quite unable to take any additional engagements. I am embarrased by the number I have".<p>William Morley Punshon [1824-1881] was an English nonconformist minister. Ordained in Manchester in 1849, he went to Chicago as the representative of the Wesleyan Methodist conference. He subsequently settled in Canada and did much to advance the cause of his denomination. His preaching and lectures drew great crowds both in Canada and the United States and he was five times president of the Canadian conference. He also restored the fortunes of the flagging Victoria college in Cobourg, Ontario [now Victoria University] and created the great Metropolitan Methodist Church in downtown Toronto [now Metropolitan United Church].

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER ABOUT A LECTURE FEE SIGNED BY AMERICAN CONGREGATIONALIST CLERGYMAN AND EDUCATOR ROSWELL DWIGHT HITCHCOCK.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER ABOUT A LECTURE FEE SIGNED BY AMERICAN CONGREGATIONALIST CLERGYMAN AND EDUCATOR ROSWELL DWIGHT HITCHCOCK.

By Hitchcock, Roswell Dwight. (1817-1887). American Congregationalist clegryman.

New York: August 15th, 1865.. 1865.. Very good. - Letter penned in black ink and filling the 1st side of a sheet of lined paper which has been folded to form 4 sides, each 7-1/2 inches high by 5 inches wide. Signed "Roswell D. Hitchcock". The bottom edge of the paper is slightly roughed. Folded twice for mailing. Very good. <p>Hitchcock replies to an invitation to give a lecture: "if I can have Monday Evening Jany. 1st, 1866, I will lecture for $60.00. If I take an evening at your convenience, I shall have to charge $100.00, which, perhaps is too much for my lecture, or any other man's...." Hitchcock's proposed fees in modern dollars would equate to approximately $1,000 and $1,500.<p>Roswell Dwight Hitchcock [1817-1887] was a United States Congregationalist clergyman. He became professor of natural and revealed religion in Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine in 1852 and in 1855 professor of church history in the Union Theological Seminary in New York, of which he was president from 1880 to 1887. This letter was written from the New York seminary.

$75.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by the radical minister WILLIAM J. POTTER regarding a lecture he will give.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by the radical minister WILLIAM J. POTTER regarding a lecture he will give.

By Potter, William J. (1829-1893). Radical minister in the American Free Thought tradition. He was influenced by the Transcendentalists and later, Darwin.

New Bedford, MA: December 30, 1874.. 1874.. Very good. - Octavo, 8 inches high by 5 inches wide. Two pages penned on the first and third pages of a folded sheet. Over 150 words penned by the radical minister William J. Potter addressed to a Mrs. Richmond regarding arrangements for a lecture he will give at the meeting of her club. After mentioning that she should expect him on the 5 p.m. train, as that is the earliest he can leave Boston for Lowell that day, he expresses his pleasure that she likes his latest essay: "I am glad if you have found so much to enjoy in my essay on 'The New Protestantism'" and, though he would be tempted to read it at the lecture he had "thought of reading a paper which I call 'Two Views of Tradition, - The Ecclesiastical & the Scientific.' And on the whole this seems to me more appropriate." Signed "Wm. J. Potter". In a postscript, Potter suggests that if Mrs. Richmond's not fully recovered her health by then, it might be better to postpone the meeting and he would then come later in the season. Folded several times for mailing with a small piece out from the bottom front corner of the second page. <p>The Unitarian minister and Freethinker William James Potter (1829-1893) was a radical minister in the American Free Thought tradition of his era. Influenced by the Transcendentalists, he was later strongly influenced by Charles Darwin. Moving from his Quaker foundations to Unitarian Christianity and then towards free religion, Potter was a founder with David Atwood Wasson of the Free Religious Association (1867- 1920). Potter drafted the Free Religious Association's constitution and eventually served as it's president: "The new society would dedicate itself to the emancipation of religion from the thralldom of irrational and traditional authorities." From 1859 to 1892, he served as the minister of the Unitarian Church in New Bedford (First Congregational Society). Potter was the poet Conrad Aiken's grandfather. In his autobiography "Ushant", Aiken says that his entire life was devoted to the ideas and work of Potter.

$150.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by the RABID ANTI-CATHOLIC REVEREND WILLIAM K. HOYT to the editor of the Police Gazette regarding accusations of "swindling".
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by the RABID ANTI-CATHOLIC REVEREND WILLIAM K. HOYT to the editor of the Police Gazette regarding accusations of "swindling".

By Hoyt, Reverend William K.

New York, April 30th, 1850.. 1850.. Good. - Over 80 words penned on 6-1/4 inch high by 7-3/4 inch wide buff paper. Under the heading of "A card - To the Public" Rev. William K. Hoyt addresses his letter to the editor of the Police Gazette. Complaining of an article which appeared in the Police Gazette the previous week entitled "A gross case of Swindling" which implicates Hoyt. The Reverend claims that it is "calculated to do me great injury while the facts of the case have not yet transpired by an investigation...." He goes on to request that "the community may suspend their opinion...." until he's had opportunity to defend himself in court from "the base charges thus made against me". Signed "Wllm K. Hoyt". Folded for mailing, the letter is creased and soiled with some tiny specks of ink touching the word "Gazette" at the top. <p>An anti-Catholic Protestant minister in New York, the Reverend William K. Hoyt published sensationalistic claims made by Maria Monk in a nativist periodical, the "American Protestant Vindicator". Several of the stories were probably fabricated by Hoyt. They were subsequently published in a book entitled "Awful Disclosures of Maria Monk", a work supposedly written by her. A young prostitute, Maria Monk had been confined in the Charitable Institution for Female Penitents by her mother. Her behavior having led to her expulsion, Maria ran off to the United States with the Reverend Hoyt. The book, supposedly narrated by Maria Monk to the Reverend John Jay Slocum, claimed she'd been a nun at the Hotel-Dieu convent in Montreal. According to the book and stories, Maria supposedly claimed that nuns were forced to have intercourse with priests and she had witnessed a nun being killed for resisting a priest's advances and that babies born to the nuns were strangled and buried in the convent's basement. Pregnant when she arrived in New York, which was not a surprising condition for a prostitute in the 19th Century, the book claimed that the father was the Abbe Patrick Phelan. The stories played into the anti-Catholic nativist's convictions of the period. The appearance of another supposed nun who was said to have also fled from the convent, drew even more attention. The tales of secret passages, scandalous behavior and crimes at the Hotel-Dieu convent came under investigation by journalists, including the American journalist William Leete Stone, who very quickly recognized the lie after gaining access to the convent. Stone wrote that "After 10 minutes the imposture had become as plain as day. I now declare more openly than ever that neither Maria Monk nor Francis Partridge have ever set foot in the convent of Hotel Dieu". Meanwhile, the Reverend Hoyt and his cohorts had pocketed most of the profits from the best seller and additional sensational books which supposedly related Maria's experiences as a nun were published. Interest in the Monk affair finally declined after a Protestant organization was given permission to visit the Hotel-Dieu and Iles des Soeurs. In 1849 Maria Monk was arrested in a "house of ill repute" for stealing from her "client" and, incarcerated in a New York prison. She died there that Summer.<p>A rare letter from one of the 19th century's most notorious charlatans.

$375.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY GEORGE BURGESS, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF MAINE.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY GEORGE BURGESS, EPISCOPAL BISHOP OF MAINE.

By Burgess, George. (1809-1866). The first Episcopal bishop of Maine and rector of the church in Gardiner, Maine.

Gardiner, ME: April 5, 1860.. 1860.. Very good. - Two paragraphs penned in black ink & filling one side of a sheet of cream paper, approximately 8 inches high by 5 inches wide. Signed "Affectionately yours, / George Burgess". There is some very light creasing to the paper. There is a small piece out of the top left corner with surface tears & glue marks to all 4 corners of the verso where the letter has been removed from an album. Folded twice for mailing. Very good. <p>Burgess writes to a Mr. Slattery: "I have heard nothing from London. If you find a disposition to invite Mr. Southgate and he is willing to come, I have no objection, and indeed should be glad of the arrangement, as Mrs. Miller or Mrs. Howard might go to [----] in the summer...."<p>Horatio Southgate [1812-1894] was a native of Maine who became a member of the American Episcopal Church in 1834 and was ordained to the priesthood in 1839. George Burgess [1809-1866] was the first Episcopal bishop of Maine. He was born in Providence, Rhode Island and was ordained to the priesthood in 1834, becoming rector of Christ Church in Hartford, Connecticut. He was elected first bishop of Maine in 1847. On moving to Maine he became rector of the church in Gardiner, a position he retained until his death in 1866.

$50.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN PASTOR RAY PALMER, AUTHOR OF "MY FAITH LOOKS UP TO THEE".
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY AMERICAN PASTOR RAY PALMER, AUTHOR OF "MY FAITH LOOKS UP TO THEE".

By Palmer, Ray. (1808-1887). American pastor and author of a number of hymns, including "My faith looks up to Thee".

New York: September 8th, 1870.. 1870.. Very good. - Letter penned in black ink on 1-1/2 sides of a sheet of paper folded to form 4 sides, each side 8 inches high by 5 inches wide. Signed "Ray Palmer". There is a small piece out of the top corner of the 3rd side [not affecting the text] with a glue stain to the blank verso where the letter has been removed from an album. Folded twice for mailing. Very good. <p>Ray Palmer replies to a Mr. Savage who has asked him to contact "Dr. Hall". Palmer regrets that Dr. Hall is out of the city till the following week. "I preach for him one more Sabbath. As soon as he returns, I will see him if I can. One may almost as well try to catch a deer in the Adirondacks, I suppose, but I will try, & will make report to you...."<p>Ray Palmer was an American pastor who wrote a number of hymns, the best known being "My Faith Looks Up to Thee". Palmer wrote the lyrics for this hymn upon receiving a vision of Christ shortly after graduating from Yale University. He only unearthed them two years later when Lowell Mason asked him for a contribution to a new hymnal. At the time of this letter Palmer held the secretaryship of the American Congregational Union in New York City.

$150.00

ORIGINES SACRAE: OR A RATIONAL ACCOUNT OF THE GROUNDS OF NATURAL AND REVEAL'D RELIGION. The Seventh Edition. To which is now added part of another book upon the same subject Written A.D. MDCXCVII. Publish'd from the Author's Own Manuscript. By the Right Reverend Father in God, Edward Stillingfleet, D.D. Late Lord Bishop of Worchester.

By Stillingfleet, Edward (1635-1699).

Cambridge: Printed at the University-Press, for Henry Mortlock, at the Sign of the Phoenix in St. Paul's Church-yard, 1702.. 1702.. Good. - Quarto, 12-3/4 inches high by 8-3/8 inches wide. Bound in full early brown calf, rebacked with a new calf spine. Roulette decorations in blind frame the decorative panels which enhance the covers. The binding is titled in gilt with raised bands on the spine. The covers are rubbed and scuffed with wear to the edges and corners. The pagination is as follows: [26], 328 pages, pages 339-424, [4], 126 & [2] pages, illustrated with a superb portrait frontispiece of the author engraved by R. White after M. Heal. A collective title page printed in red and black is followed by the two subsequent black & white title pages preceding the respective "parts". Pages 329 through 338 are skipped in the numbering, as issued, and without any loss of the text. The endpapers and pastedowns are foxed and their edges darkened. The pages are toned, some slightly darkened. There is some minor foxing to the first and last few pages and some occasional foxing within as well as small stains to the bottom edge of the frontispiece. There are some faint indentations to the edges of a few pages and the last several pages show evidence of an oval indentation. Good. <p>From the library of Edward Nelson, with his name penned in ink at the top of the front endpaper.<p>Contains the two parts, each with its own black & white title page dated 1701. The first part's title page reads "Origines Sacrae: or a rational account of the grounds of the Christian faith...", the second part's title page reads "Origines Sacrae: or a rational account of the grounds of natural and reveal'd religion: wherein the foundations of religion, ... are asserted and clear'd;..." This second part has its own pagination and register.<p>Making an argument against Isaac La Peyrere's Pre-Adamite theories, "Origines Sacrae" comprehensively analyses flaws in the works of ancient historians to defend the Book of Genesis.<p>The British theologian and scholar Edward Stillingfleet (1635-1699) was considered an outstanding preacher and defender of Anglicanism. John Hough referred to him as "the ablest man of his time". Samuel Pepys reported that he couldn't get in to hear the sermon when Stillingfleet preached at St. Margaret in Westminster on the day following the Great London Fire. He was considered a leader of the group of Anglicans pejoratively referred to as "latidunarians" which grew out of the teachings of Cambridge Platonists. His thoughts and attitude were closely associated with those of Isaac Barrow, Robert South and John Tillitson, discarding allegorical readings in favor of a literal interpretation and preaching on behalf of reason and natural religion and thus contributing to the changing character of theology from dogmatic to rationalistic. Stillingfleet and the others were sympathetic to the new science of their time.

$250.00

A TOKEN FOR MOURNERS, Or, The Advice of Christ to a Distressed Mother, bewailing the death of her dear and only Son, wherein the boundaries of sorrow are duly fixed, excesses restrained, the common pleas answered, and divers rules for the support of God's afflicted ones prescrieed [sic].

By Flavel, John.

Newbury, [Vermont.]: Printed by Nathaniel Coverly, near the Court-House, 1796.. 1796.. Fair. A RARE NEWBURY, VERMONT IMPRINT - Octavo, bound in full early brown calf with simple blind rules on the spine. The leather is quite rubbed and scuffed. The pagination is as follows: viiii [i.e. ix], [i] and 11-148. The hinges are cracked and there is evidence of minor early worming to the front edge of the front pastedown. The pages are darkened and foxed with some minor staining to the front edges. <p>A rare Newbury, VT imprint. [Ref.: McCorison, M.A. Vermont, 387].<p>Although not indicated in the imprint, the book was most probably printed by Nathaniel Coverly, Junior. His father, Nathaniel Coverly, Senior, was active as a printer from 1767- 1805. His son joined him in the business in 1795. Nathaniel Coverly, Jr. opened his printing office in Newbury, VT in 1796. He opened his shop near the courthouse in the hope that he would attract printing business from the lawyers and others populating that part of the city. Unfortunately, the court was moved to Chelsea in 1796. By September 1798 Coverly was trying to sell his Newbury business. An ad in the Salem Gazette read: "To be Sold, Cheap". Apart from his newspaper business it would appear that he published very few books in Newbury. According to a "Checklist of the Publications of Nathaniel Coverly and Son, 1767-1825" by Kate Van Winkle Keller, published by the American Antiquarian Society in 2008, he printed only 5 books in Newbury, Vermont.<p>RARE.

$750.00

THE STORY OF SOUTHERN HYMNOLOGY.

By Stevenson, Arthur L.

Salem, VA: Arthur L. Stevenson, 1931.. 1931.. Good. - Octavo, dark blue cloth titled in gilt on the spine & front cover. The binding is lightly rubbed. The spine & its gilt titling are faded with the head of the spine bumped & lightly chipped. vi, [1] leaf & 187 pages. The gutters are a bit darkened. A previous owner's faded signature is penned on the front endpaper Good. <p>First edition.<p>The author writes: "The unity of this treatise is a geographical one, and matter not pertaining in any way to...hymns or tune writers of the Southern States has been excluded." Stevenson discusses Baptist, Presbyterian and Methodist hymns, Gospel hymns, Sunday School hymns, and the unifying or disruptive influence of hymns on the individual, the family and the congregation. The texts of many hymns are quoted. No music is included.

$25.00

OFFICIAL CIRCULAR: ANCIENT AND ILLUSTRIOUS ORDER / KNIGHTS OF MALTA. No. 20. Continent of America. October, 1905.

By Higgins, Willie E.; Supreme Commander; et al.

Philadelphia, PA: Knights of Malta, 1905.. 1905.. Good. - Octavo, softcover bound in cream wrappers with the front wrap illustrated & decorated in black & red and a black-and-white photo of Niagara Falls on the rear wrap. The binding is bumped with minor soiling to the rear wrap & some creasing to its top edge. 32 pages. Full-page & textual illustrations in black & white. 1 signature [i.e. group of pages] is partially detached & the pages are very lightly bumped. There a vertical crease to each wrap & a light vertical crease to each page where the circular has been folded. Good. <p>This circular announces the twenty- second annual convention of the American Continent Knights of Malta to be held at the Cataract International House, Niagara Falls, N.Y. from October 17-19, 1905. Details of travel and accommodation arrangements and information on tourist sites are included. There are lists of officers, and poems and articles relating to the principles and aims of the order.

$20.00

AUTOGRAPH LETTER CONCERNING HIS PERSONAL FINANCES SIGNED BY HENRY C. POTTER Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York known for his interest in social reform and politics.
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER CONCERNING HIS PERSONAL FINANCES SIGNED BY HENRY C. POTTER Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York known for his interest in social reform and politics.

By Potter, Henry C. (1835-1908). Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York. Notable for his interest in social reform and politics.

New York City: May 28, 1887., 1887.. Very good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling 2 sides of a sheet of Grace Church Rectory letterhead folded to form 4 sides, each 8 inches high by 5-1/8 inches wide. Signed "H. C. Potter". Folded 3 times for mailing. Very good. <p>Bishop Potter writes about his personal finances: "I believe there is a standing arrangement which I made in 1875 that when I should so elect, my annual premiums should be charged against my accrued dividends...."<p>Henry C. Potter [1835-1908] was the seventh Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York. In 1892, during his administration, the cornerstone of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine was laid. Potter was notable for his interest in social reform and politics. While he was rector of Grace Church, New York [1868-1884] he worked to inaugurate working men's clubs, day nurseries and kindergartens and, long after he became bishop, he continued to take part in the summer work of missions on the east side of New York City. In 1900, he attacked the Tammany Hall administration, accusing the city of protecting vice and helped lead a reform movement which elected a new mayor.

$25.00

DIVINE GLORY, BROUGHT TO VIEW, IN THE CONDEMNATION OF THE UNGODLY: Or the Doctrine of Future Punishment, Illustrated and Vindicated, as Rational and True. In Reply to a late Pamphlet, Entitled, Salvation for all Men. By a Friend to Truth.

By Eckley, Joseph (1750-1811).

Boston: Printed by Robert Hodge, at his Office, in Marshalls Lane, near the Boston Stone, 1782.. 1782.. Fair. - Octavo, 8-3/4 inches high by 5-5/8 inches wide. Softcover, bound stitched printed self-wraps. The covers are darkened and foxed with several chips and tears along the edges. A piece is clipped from the top edge of the title cover page and a hole at its center has been repaired with early tape from the verso. An early owner's name is penned at the top of the front cover leaf. 51 deckle-edged pages. The pages are foxed. The edges of the pages are creased and chipped with several short tears. There is a hole to page 39 affecting one or two words on that page and page 40. <p>First edition. RARE.<p>Joseph Eckley's reply to Charles Chauncy's "Salvation for all men..." and to James Relly's "Union: or a Treatise of the consanguinity and affinity between Christ and his church...." Some copies of this pamphlet include an 8 page "Appendix, in answer to a late letter, entitled, Divine glory brought to view, in the final salvation of all men. Addressed to the writer of this pamphlet" bound at the end which the English Short Title Catalogue indicates was "Evidently issued after publication of the main part of the work." That appendix is NOT here present.<p>Joseph Eckley (1750-1811) emigrated to New Jersey from England in 1767. He received his bachelor and masters degrees from Princeton in 1775 and, in 1779, became pastor of Old South Church in Boston.

$175.00

SUPERIOR SKILL AND WISDOM NECESSARY FOR WINNING SOULS, WHICH IS THE GRAND DESIGN OF THE MINISTERIAL OFFICE, Illustrated in a Sermon Preached at the Ordination of the Reverend Mr. John Sparhawk, To the Pastoral Office over a Church of Christ in Salem; on the eighth day of December, 1736. By Nathanael Appleton, M.A. Pastor of the Church of Christ in Cambridge. Together with the Charge given by the Reverend Mr. Holyoke : And the Right Hand of Fellowship, by the Reverend Mr. Prescott.

By (Sparhawk, John). Appleton, Nathanael (Nathaniel).

Boston: Printed and Sold by Kneeland and Green, in Queenstreet, 1737.. 1737.. Fair. - Octavo. 7-1/4 inches high by 4-3/4 inches wide. Softcover, bound in stitched self-wrappers. A piece is torn from the top corner of the front cover, without loss to the title, with a small strip torn from the bottom edge of that cover. The covers are darkened & stained with creases to the edges and stab marks through the left edge. [2] & 51 deckle-edged pages and [1 blank], with formal woodcut head and tailpieces. The overlapping edges of a couple of leaves are chipped and there is evidence of minor early worming to the bottom inner edge of a few pages. A few corners are creased and there is some light dampstaining to the top right edge of several pages. The half-title is lacking, else the book collates as complete. <p>First edition. [Evans 4111].<p>The Revivalist Congregational pastor Nathanael [Nathaniel] Appleton (1693-1784) was the pastor at the Church of Christ in Cambridge from 1717 to 1783. It is now called the "First Church in Cambridge". Appleton graduated from Harvard in 1712 and was ordained at Cambridge in 1717. He was elected a fellow of Harvard in that same year. In 1771, Harvard conferred upon him only the second degree it had ever granted of Doctor of Divinity (the first was awarded to Increase Mather 80 years earlier).

$375.00

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