American Fiction

From To Kill a Mockingbird to On the Road, from Follow Me Down to Elmer, we can help you find the american fiction books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com.au, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Subcategories in American Fiction

Top Sellers in American Fiction

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.
Gone With the Wind

Gone With the Wind

by Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell only published one complete novel, but it was quite the book - Gone With the Wind earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and National Book Award for 1936. The epic romance tale set in and around Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War has remained a bestseller, even before the equally popular film starring Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh was made in 1939.
The Old Man and The Sea

The Old Man and The Sea

by Ernest Hemingway

This novella, only 140 pages, was first
printed in it's entirety in Life Magazine Sept 1st 1952,
inspiring a buying frenzy selling over 5 million copies of the
magazine in just 2 days.
The story about an aging Cuban
fisherman wrangling a large marlin in the gulf stream was written in
1951 in Cuba and published in 1952. In 1953 it won the Pulitzer Prize
for Fiction and led to Hemingway's nomination for the Nobel Prize in
Literature in 1954.
Man's struggle against nature is the
resounding theme throughout... Read more
The Grapes Of Wrath

The Grapes Of Wrath

by John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath
stands as a pivotal piece of American literature. The story follows
the Joad family (and thousands of others) as they are driven from the
Oklahoma farm where they are sharecroppers during the Great
Depression. The drought, economic hardship, and changes in financial
and agricultural industries send them searching for dignity and
honest work in the bountiful state of California.


The novel earned Steinbeck the Pulitzer
Prize for fiction in 1940, and inspired the... Read more
For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

by Ernest Hemingway

Many consider For Whom the Bell Tolls to be author Ernest Hemingway’s finest work. Inspired by Hemingway’s time as a war correspondent for The North American Newspaper Alliance during the Spanish Civil War, For Whom the Bell Tolls is a stark and brutal commentary on the nature of war, sacrifice, and death. In fact, many believe his work is among the best depictions of the Spanish Civil War written. As with some of Hemingway’s other work, many of the characters, experiences, and... Read more
Ulysses

Ulysses

by James Joyce

Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first
serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later
published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of
Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to
publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later.
Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin.... Read more
The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F Scott Fitzgerald

Written in 1925, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is widely
considered to be one of the author’s greatest works. Set in New York City and
Long Island during the Roaring Twenties, the focus of the story is (of course)
its title character, Jay Gatsby, and his unswerving desire to be reunited with
Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. However, Nick Carraway,
who happens to be both Gatsby’s neighbor and Daisy’s cousin, narrates Gatsby's journey
from poverty to wealth, into the... Read more
The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

Commonly named among the Great American novels, The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, is generally regarded as the
sequel to his earlier novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; however, in
Huckleberry Finn, Twain focused increasingly on the institution of
slavery and the South. Narrated by Huckleberry “Huck” Finn in Southern
antebellum vernacular, the novel gives vivid descriptions of people and
daily life along the Mississippi River while following the adventure of
Huck and... Read more
A Farewell To Arms

A Farewell To Arms

by Ernest Hemingway

Set during World War 1, Ernest Hemingway’s A
Farewell to Arms is the story of Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American serving
as an ambulance driver in the Italian army, and his love affair with an English
nurse named Catherine Barkley. The novel is semi-autobiographical, based on
Hemingway's own experiences serving in the Italian campaigns during the war.
While some assume the title of the work to be taken from a poem by 16th century
English dramatist George Peele, others believe it to be a simple pun... Read more
Sun Also Rises

Sun Also Rises

by Ernest Hemingway

Based on real events and acquaintances of Hemingway, Sun Also Rises is about American and English expats in Pamplona.
Atlas Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged

by Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged is a novel by Ayn Rand, first published in 1957 in the United States. This was Rand's fourth, longest and last novel, and she considered it her magnum opus in the realm of fiction writing. As indicated by its working title The Strike, the book explores a dystopian United States where leading innovators, ranging from industrialists to artists, refuse to be exploited by society.
Leaves Of Grass

Leaves Of Grass

by Walt Whitman

Leaves of Grass (1855) is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman. Among the poems in the collection are "Song of Myself," "I Sing the Body Electric," "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking," and in later editions, Whitman's elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd. " Whitman spent his entire life writing Leaves of Grass, revising it in several editions until his death. The first edition published in 1855 contained 12 poems on 95 pages.... Read more
East Of Eden

East Of Eden

by John Steinbeck

East of Eden is a novel by Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck, published in September 1952. Often described as Steinbeck's most ambitious novel, East of Eden brings to life the intricate details of two families, the Trasks and the Hamiltons, and their interwoven stories. The novel was originally addressed to Steinbeck's young sons, Thom and John (then 6½ and 4½ respectively). Steinbeck wanted to describe the Salinas Valley for them in detail: the sights, sounds, smells, and colors.
Catch-22

Catch-22

by Joseph Heller

Catch-22 is Joseph Heller’s first novel and his most
acclaimed work. Set during World War II, the novel uses a distinctive non-chronological
third-person omniscient narration, mainly focusing on the life of Captain John
Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. Occasionally, the narrator
also shows us how other characters, such as the chaplain or Hungry Joe,
experience the world around them. As the novel’s events are described from the
different points of view through separate... Read more
The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer

The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer

by Mark Twain

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, is a popular 1876 novel about a young boy growing up in the antebellum South on the Mississippi River in the town of St. Petersberg, based on the town of Hannibal, Missouri.
Moby Dick

Moby Dick

by Herman Melville

Melville's classic was first published in England as three volumes titled The Whale in October 1851. Slow sales of Melville's previously books convinced Publisher L. Richard Bentley to reduce the printing to only 500 copies, and of that, only 300 sold in the first 4 months. The remaining unbound sheets were bound in a cheaper casing in 1852, and in 1853 there were still enough remaining sheets to again bind into an even cheaper edition.Melville changed the title to Moby Dick a month later, November 1851,... Read more
A Moveable Feast

A Moveable Feast

by Ernest Hemingway

A Moveable Feast is a set of memoirs by American author Ernest Hemingway about his years in Paris as part of the American expatriate circle of writers in the 1920s. In addition to painting a picture of Hemingway's time as a struggling young writer, the book also sketches the story of Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley. A Moveable Feast is considered by many to contain some of his best writing.
Of Mice and Men

Of Mice and Men

by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men is a novella written by Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck. Published in 1937, it tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced migrant ranch workers during the Great Depression in California.
Midnight In the Garden Of Good and Evil

Midnight In the Garden Of Good and Evil

by John Berendt

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil is a work by John Berendt. The book was Berendt's first, and became a The New York Times bestseller for 216 weeks following its debut. The book was subsequently made into a 1997 movie directed by Clint Eastwood based loosely on Berendt's story.
The Shack

The Shack

by William P Young

The Shack is a novel by Canadian author William P. Young, a former office manager and hotel night clerk, published in 2007. The novel was self-published but became a USA Today bestseller, having sold 1 million copies as of June 8, 2008. It was the #1 Paperback trade fiction seller on the New York Times best sellers list from June 2008 to early 2010. Young originally wrote The Shack as a Christmas gift for his six children with no apparent intention of publishing it.
Uncle Tom's Cabin

Uncle Tom's Cabin

by Harriet Beecher Stowe

In Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriett Beecher Stowe, the title character Uncle Tom is a long-suffering slave, loyal to both his faith and his master. Presented with an opportunity to escape, he instead chooses to remain in slavery to avoid embarrassing his master. After being sold to a slave trader, Tom suffers brutal treatment and is eventually beaten to death for his refusal to betray his friends — made to represent an ideal of true Christianity. Enormously popular (it was the best-selling novel of the... Read more
Cannery Row

Cannery Row

by John Steinbeck

Cannery Row is the waterfront street in the New Monterey section of Monterey, California, USA. It is the site of a number of now-defunct sardine canning factories. The street name, formerly a nickname for Ocean View Avenue, became official in January 1958 to honor John Steinbeck and his famous novel Cannery Row.
The Scarlet Letter

The Scarlet Letter

by Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Scarlet Letter: A Romance (1850) is considered the American author Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'masterwork.' A work of historical fiction set in the Massachusetts Bay Colony during the Puritan settlement of 1642-1949 itells the story of Hester Prynne, who after having a child as a result of an extra-marital affair attempts to live a life of repentance and dignity although she is marked by having to wear a Scarlett A on her person. Throughout the novel, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and... Read more
On the Road

On the Road

by Jack Kerouac

Perhaps
the most famous and influential of the Beat novels, Jack Kerouac's On
the Road represents much of what
made the Beat and Counterculture movements so unique and important.
The plot concerning the road trips and adventures experienced by
Kerouac and his friends is well-known, as are the rumors and tall
tales of the books' production.


Kerouac
often claimed that the wrote On the Road
in a mere three weeks on a single 120-foot scroll of paper. Although
that scroll does indeed exist and is featured... Read more

American Fiction Books & Ephemera

Follow Me Down

Follow Me Down

by Foote, Shelby

Shelby Foote was born on November 7, 1916 in Greenville, Mississippi, and attended school there until he entered the University of North Carolina. During World War II he served as a captain of field artillery but never saw combat. After World War II he worked briefly for the Associated Press in their New York bureau. In 1953 he moved to Memphis, where he lived for the remainder of his life.Foote was the author of six novels: Tournament, Follow Me Down, Love in a Dry Season, Shiloh, Jordan County, and... Read more
Henry James

Henry James

by James, Henry

Henry James (1843-1916), born in New York City, was the son of noted religious philosopher Henry James, Sr., and brother of eminent psychologist and philosopher William James. He spent his early life in America and studied in Geneva, London and Paris during his adolescence to gain the worldly experience so prized by his father. He lived in Newport, went briefly to Harvard Law School, and in 1864 began to contribute both criticism and tales to magazines. In 1869, and then in 1872-74, he paid visits to... Read more
God\'s Little Acre

God's Little Acre

by Caldwell, Erskine

God's Little Acre by author Erskine
Caldwell tells the story of a rural, proletariat family in South
Carolina whose lives seemingly revolve around the pursuit of sex and
money. A commentary on the plight of the working class sans union
protection in the 1930s, the novel also explores themes on land and
resource conservation. Due to the sexual imagery, Caldwell was sued
for the dissemination of pornography, but ultimately prevailed in
court. The case and decision is considered significant in the... Read more
The Yearling

The Yearling

by Rawlings, Marjorie Kinnan

The Yearling is a 1938 novel written by Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings. It won the Pulitzer Prize for the Novel in 1939. Rawlings's editor was Maxwell Perkins, who also worked with F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and other literary luminaries. She had submitted several projects to Perkins for his review, and he rejected them all. He instructed her to write about what she knew from her own life, and the result of her taking his advice was The Yearling.
All the King\'s Men

All the King's Men

by Warren, Robert Penn

All the King's Men is a novel by Robert Penn Warren, first published in 1946. The novel's title is drawn from the nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty. In 1947 Warren won the Pulitzer Prize for All the King's Men. It was adapted for film in 1949 and 2006; the 1949 version won the Academy Award for Best Picture.
Bridge Of San Luis Rey

Bridge Of San Luis Rey

by Wilder, Thornton

The Bridge of San Luis Rey is American author Thornton Wilder's second novel, first published in 1927 to worldwide acclaim. It tells the story of several interrelated people who die in the collapse of an Inca rope-fiber suspension bridge in Peru, and the events that lead up to their being on the bridge. A friar who has witnessed the tragic accident then goes about inquiring into the lives of the victims, seeking some sort of cosmic answer to the question of why each had to die.
The Great Santini

The Great Santini

by Conroy, Pat

The Great Santini is a novel written by Pat Conroy and published in 1976.Marine Col. Bull Meecham commands his home like a soldiers’ barracks. Cold and controlling, but also loving, Bull has complicated relationships with each member of his family—in particular, his eldest son, Ben. A born athlete who desperately seeks his father’s approval, Ben is determined to break out from the colonel’s shadow. With guidance from teachers at his new school, he strives to find the courage to stand up to... Read more
95 Poems

95 Poems

by Cummings, E E

Any Cold Jordan

Any Cold Jordan

by Bottoms, David

A Faulkner Miscellany

A Faulkner Miscellany

by Meriwether, James B

Elmer

Elmer

by Faulkner, William