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INTRODUCTION TO MICROWAVES.
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INTRODUCTION TO MICROWAVES.

By Ramo, Simon.

New York and London: McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1945., 1945.. Good. - Octavo, gray cloth in a dust wrapper. The spine of the dust jacket & the top edges of its panels are slightly darkened. x & 138 pages. Illustrated with diagrams in black & white. A previous owner's name & date are penned on the front endpaper. There are pencil markings in the margins of the text. Good. First edition, first printing."A completely non-mathematical description of the physical basis for all microwave phenomena for engineers and industrial men who desire an understanding of microwaves and their application." [From the dust wrapper copy].

$45.00

DESCRIPTION OF A SPEEDY ELEVATOR. By the Inventor, Nicholas Collin, D.D. with two drawings from a model representing it folded and wound up. [Together with]: A DESCRIPTION OF THE BONES DEPOSITED, BY THE PRESIDENT, IN THE MUSEUM OF THE SOCIETY, and represented in the annexed plates. By C. Wistar, M.D. [From the \
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DESCRIPTION OF A SPEEDY ELEVATOR. By the Inventor, Nicholas Collin, D.D. with two drawings from a model representing it folded and wound up. [Together with]: A DESCRIPTION OF THE BONES DEPOSITED, BY THE PRESIDENT, IN THE MUSEUM OF THE SOCIETY, and represented in the annexed plates. By C. Wistar, M.D. [From the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, volume IV"].

By Collin, Nicholas [Nils]; and Wistar, Caspar.

[Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by Thomas Dobson], [1799]., [1799].. Very good. ILLUSTRATED WITH 3 ENGRAVED PLATES, INCLUDING 2 FOLDING - Quarto, 11-3/4 inches high by 9-3/8 inches wide. Unbound signatures from the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society". 13 deckle-edged pages in all, with large uncut & untrimmed margins, consisting of pages 519 to 531. Illustrated with 3 full-page plates, including a plate depicting the folded and deployed states of Collin's speedy elevator engraved by Smither and two 11-3/8 inch high by 16-3/4 inch wide folding plates of bones engraved by James Akin. There is some faint minor foxing and the overlapping edges of the pages are lightly chipped. Very good. Unbound sheets from volume 4 of the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society".Two works with Nicholas Collin's "Description of a Speedy Elevator" consisting of pages 519 through 525 and Caspar Wistar's "Description of Bones" consisting of pages 526 through 531.The Swedish inventor Nicholas [Nils] Collin (1746-1831) was the pastor of the Gloria Dei Church in Philadelphia. He designed a "speedy elevator" which could be easily folded and stored as a fast way to ascend the heights. His elevator could be used as a fire ladder, for raising a light, or for military reconnaissance. "Elevation of a person for taking views, and a quick descent when required; as on reconnoitering an enemy within shot: a machine for lifting him at least one hundred feet by eight men can be light enough for carrying on a waggon by two horses."According to a column published in the May 1952 issue of the "Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians": "The elevator designed by the Reverend Nicholas Collin of Philadelphia rates some kind of priority among early American examples. His paper and a model were presented before the American Philosophical Society on December 2, 1791 and honored by award of the Magellanean gold medal in December, 1795. The copperplate ... was published in Volume IV of the Society's Transactions (1799) with an elaborate description of its design and operation...."The American physician and anatomist Caspar Wistar (1761-1818) was first educated at the Friends' school in Philadelphia. He became interested in medicine after caring for the wounded at the Revolutionary War Battle of Germantown and went on to study medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and subsequently the University of Edinburgh, achieving his degree in 1786. While in Scotland, he served as president of the Royal Medical Society of Edinburgh. He returned to practice medicine in Philadelphia and was a professor with the University of Pennsylvania. He was appointed chair of anatomy following Dr. William Shippen, Jr.'s death. In 1797, Thomas Jefferson announced the discovery of the remains of a large quadruped in Virginia. Thinking it was a large cat-like animal, Jefferson called it a Megalonyx (Giant Claw). After studying the bones, Wistar wrote an anatomical essay which correctly suggested the remains resembled those of a large sloth. Wistar went on to succeed Thomas Jefferson as president of the American Philosophical Society. The Wisteria, a flowering vine, was named in his memory by his friend the botanist Thomas Nuttall.

$450.00

GENERAL PRINCIPLES AND CONSTRUCTION OF A SUB-MARINE VESSEL, Communicated by D. Bushnell of Connecticut, the Inventor, in a Letter of October, 1787, to Thomas Jefferson then Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at Paris. [From the \
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GENERAL PRINCIPLES AND CONSTRUCTION OF A SUB-MARINE VESSEL, Communicated by D. Bushnell of Connecticut, the Inventor, in a Letter of October, 1787, to Thomas Jefferson then Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States at Paris. [From the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Volume IV"].

By Bushnell, David (1740-1824 or 1826?). American submarine inventor, scholar, patriot and veteran of the American Revolutionary War.

[Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by Thomas Dobson], [1799]., [1799].. Very good. - Quarto, 11-1/2 inches high by 9-1/8 inches wide. Unbound signatures from the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society". 10 deckle-edged pages in all, with large uncut & untrimmed margins, consisting of pages 303 through 312. There is a small spot of oxidation to the first page with some very minor foxing in the margins. Very good. First published edition.Unbound sheets from volume 4 of the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society".Built by David Bushnell in 1775, the Turtle was the world's first submersible ship used in combat. Early in 1775, Bushnell had successfully designed a reliable method to detonate underwater explosives and, following the Battles of Lexington and Concord, went to work on designing a submarine which would be used to attach explosives to enemy ships. In a letter to Benjamin Franklin, Bushnell wrote that the vessel would be "Constructed with Great Simplicity and upon Principles of Natural Philosophy". Likely inspired by the work of the Dutch inventor Cornelis Drebbel, who had successfully built 3 submarines in the 1620's, Bushnell enlisted the help of the New Haven clock-maker & inventor Isaac Doolittle to assist with creating the mechanical parts and propulsion system. In crafting the turtle or clam-shaped hull he enlisted the services of several skilled craftsmen including his brother Ezra Bushnell and the ship carpenter Phineas Pratt. The Turtle was first deployed in 1776 against the HSM Eagle, the flagship of British fleet which was blockading New York's harbor. The plan failed due to the inability of the submarine's operator, Sgt. Ezra Lee, to affix the explosive to the ship's hull. This was likely made worse by the lessening supply of oxygen. Another attempt was made against a British frigate anchored off Manhattan but the submarine was spotted and Sgt. Lee had to abort. The submarine was sunk a few days later. Bushnell later reported salvaging the vessel. Despite its failures, Bushnell's inventions inspired others, including Robert Fulton, to design their own submarines.The American inventor, scholar and patriot David Bushnell (1740-1824 or 1826?) was a veteran of the American Revolution. Although his vessel the Turtle did not succeed in accomplishing its missions, he is credited with creating the first submarine ever used in combat and also with creating the first time bomb. Turning his attention to creating floating mines (then known as torpedoes), their use proved ineffectual in those missions in which they were deployed largely due to their failure to strike the desired targets. In 1779, Bushnell was given command of the new "Corps of Sappers and Miners", a corps of combat engineers. Commissioned as a captain in the Continental Army in 1781, his corps saw their first action at the Siege of Yorktown. He moved to France in 1787 returning to settle in Warrenton, Georgia in 1803 where he settled under the pseudonym of David Bush.

$500.00

EXPERIMENTS ON THE TRANSMISSION OF ACIDS, AND OTHER LIQUORS, IN THE FORM OF VAPOUR, OVER SEVERAL SUBSTANCES IN A HOT EARTHEN TUBE. By Dr. Joseph Priestley. [From the \
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EXPERIMENTS ON THE TRANSMISSION OF ACIDS, AND OTHER LIQUORS, IN THE FORM OF VAPOUR, OVER SEVERAL SUBSTANCES IN A HOT EARTHEN TUBE. By Dr. Joseph Priestley. [From the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society, Volume V"].

By Priestley, Joseph (1733-1804).

[Philadelphia: Printed by Budd & Bartram for Thomas Dobson], [1802]., [1802].. Very good. - Quarto, 11 inches high by 8-3/4 inches wide. Unbound signatures from the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society". 20 deckle-edged pages in all, with large uncut & untrimmed margins, consisting of pages 1 through 20. There is some scattered foxing throughout and the edges of several leaves are chipped. Very good. Together with: "Experiments relating to the change of Place in different kinds of Air through several interposing Substances. By Dr. Joseph Priestley" consisting of pages 14 through 20.First editions.Unbound sheets from volume 5 of the "Transactions of the American Philosophical Society".The 18th century English theologian Dr. Joseph Priestly (1733-1804) was a natural historian & chemist as well as an innovative grammarian and political theorist.

$450.00

SANDFORD FLEMING, PIONEER ENGINEER.: Sandford Fleming Foundation Inaugural Lectures Delivered at University of Waterloo, March 1977.
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SANDFORD FLEMING, PIONEER ENGINEER.: Sandford Fleming Foundation Inaugural Lectures Delivered at University of Waterloo, March 1977.

By Legget, Robert F.; MacLean, The Rev. John Sandford Fleming; et al. Shortreed, Marcia; editor.

(Waterloo, Ontario, Canada): Sandford Educational Press, 1977., 1977.. Very good. - Small quarto [9 inches high by approximately 8 inches wide], softcover bound in pictorial black-and-white wrappers. The front cover is lightly foxed with a few small stains. There is some discoloration & minor soiling to the rear cover with a crease to its top corner. 63 pages. Black-and-white illustrations, including facsimiles. Very good. "The University of Waterloo...has one of the largest and best engineering schools in Canada....An educational foundation was established in 1977 to promote cooperative education and to develop new modes of interaction between industry and universities to further improve engineering education.". The foundation was named after Sandford Fleming, described in Legget's lecture as "a statesman engineer" and "truly one of the real builders of Canada". For a few years Fleming was simultaneously the Chief Engineer of the Intercolonial Railway from Halifax to Montreal, the Newfoundland Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway.

$20.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by MINERALOGIST and VICE PRESIDENT OF TIFFANY\'S GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ to James B. Pond sorting out details as he will be serving on the reception committee for Maeterlinck\'s first American lecture and may be bringing his daughter.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by MINERALOGIST and VICE PRESIDENT OF TIFFANY'S GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ to James B. Pond sorting out details as he will be serving on the reception committee for Maeterlinck's first American lecture and may be bringing his daughter.

By Kunz, George Frederick. (1856-1932). American mineralogist and vice president of Tiffany & Co. where he sought out fine gems for his clients.

New York: December 29, 1919., 1919.. Very good. - Approximately 70 words typed on 10 inch high by 8-1/4 inch wide creamy white paper. Kunz writes to James B. Pond to confirm details regarding his serving on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America. Kunz writes "Yes, I expect to be present on that evening, and it is possible that my daughter may also be present. If you can arrange tickets for me, I will be glad to pay whatever is right". Signed "George F. Kunz". The letter is folded for mailing. Very good. George Frederick Kunz [1856-1932], an American mineralogist and mineral collector, took an interest in minerals from a very young age. With no formal training he taught himself mineralogy from books and field work to the point where his expertise won him a job with Tiffany & Co. His knowledge and enthusiasm propelled him into a vice presidency by the time he was 23. He headed the U.S. mining and mineralogical exhibits at five international expositions between 1889 and 1904 and was a member of such professional organizations as the Mineralogical Society of America and the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. He was a research curator at the New York City's Museum of Natural History and was the leading advocate for the establishment of the international carat as a unit of measure for precious gems.James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides.

$100.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by MINERALOGIST and VICE PRESIDENT OF TIFFANY\'S GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ in reply to James B. Pond\'s invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck\'s first American lecture.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by MINERALOGIST and VICE PRESIDENT OF TIFFANY'S GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ in reply to James B. Pond's invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck's first American lecture.

By Kunz, George Frederick. (1856-1932). American mineralogist and vice president of Tiffany & Co. where he sought out fine gems for his clients.

New York: December 10, 1919., 1919.. Very good. - Over 75 words typed on his 9 inch high by 5-7/8 inch wide "Four hundred and five Fifth Avenue" stationery. Kunz is pleased to accept American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond's invitation to serve on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America. Kunz writes "I ... shall be pleased to serve on an honorary reception committee under the chairmanship of Mr. Otto H. Kahn, to welcome M. Maurice Maeterlinck and sponsor his first appearance". Signed "George F. Kunz". The letter is folded for mailing and there is a small piece out from the top left corner. Very good. George Frederick Kunz [1856-1932], an American mineralogist and mineral collector, took an interest in minerals from a very young age. With no formal training he taught himself mineralogy from books and field work to the point where his expertise won him a job with Tiffany & Co. His knowledge and enthusiasm propelled him into a vice presidency by the time he was 23. He headed the U.S. mining and mineralogical exhibits at five international expositions between 1889 and 1904 and was a member of such professional organizations as the Mineralogical Society of America and the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. He was a research curator at the New York City's Museum of Natural History and was the leading advocate for the establishment of the international carat as a unit of measure for precious gems.James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides.

$100.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the prominent biologist & paleontologist HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, president of the American Museum of Natural History, in reply to James B. Pond\'s invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck\'s first American lecture.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by the prominent biologist & paleontologist HENRY FAIRFIELD OSBORN, president of the American Museum of Natural History, in reply to James B. Pond's invitation to join his reception committee for Maeterlinck's first American lecture.

By Osborn, Henry Fairfield (1857-1935). Biologist & paleontologist who helped organize the Department of Vertebrate Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History and served as its president from 1908-1933.

New York, December 30, 1919., 1919.. Very good. - Over 30 words typed on 7-3/4 inch high by 5-3/4 inch wide "American Museum of Natural History" stationery with an attached blank leaf. In reply to American impresario and lecture agent James B. Pond's invitation to serve on the committee welcoming Maurice Maeterlinck to America, the noted paleontologist expresses his regrets that he won't be able to serve. Osborn writes "I regret very much indeed that I am unable to be in the City on the evening of January second." Signed "Henry Fairfield Osborn". Folded for mailing, with a tiny chip to the top left corner. Very good. A graduate of Princeton, the paleontologist Henry Fairfield Osborn (1857-1935) pursued additional studies in biological sciences at several of New York City's medical schools and also studied with Thomas H. Huxley in Great Britain. He taught natural sciences at Princeton and subsequently moved to Columbia University where he organized the Biology Department. In 1891, he helped organize the Department of Vertebrate Paleontology at the American Museum of Natural History and went on to serve as the museum's president from 1908 through 1933. He substantially expanded the museum's collection and sponsored Roy Chapman Andrew's expeditions to Central Asia in the 1920's and 30's. During his tenure, the museum became one of the preeminent natural history research institutions in the world.James B. Pond, the American impresario and lecture agent who headed the J.B. Pond Lyceum Bureau, brought the great Belgian poet Maurice Maeterlinck to America for a series of lectures. The first lecture took place at Carnegie hall on January 2nd, 1920. Unfortunately Maeterlinck failed to carry out his intention to lecture in English because of his labored "phonetic" English. He declared his intention to continue his lectures in French and have the translation read by another person. As a result, the lecture tour was a failure and lawsuits ensued on both sides.

$350.00

CUT SIGNATURE of British Chemist WILLIAM THOMAS BRANDE.
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CUT SIGNATURE of British Chemist WILLIAM THOMAS BRANDE.

By Brande, William Thomas (1788-1866). British chemist. Author of the "Manual of Chemistry", and the "Manual of Pharmacy". He was assisted by Michael Faraday when lecturing at the Royal Institution.

Circa [1850's]., [1850's].. Very good. - William Thomas Brande's autograph penned on a 3/8 inch high by 2-3/4 inch wide piece of paper clipped from a larger sheet and mounted onto a 7/8 inch high by 3-1/4 inch wide slip of paper cut from an autograph album. Very good. The English chemist William Thomas Brande (1788-1866) first studied medicine before being drawn to chemistry after meeting Humphry Davy. He first published an influential article on the measurement of alcohol in fermented drinks, including wine, cider and ale in 1811. Brande was the author of a "Manual of Chemistry" (1819) and a "Manual of Pharmacy" (1825). He was appointed professor of chemistry to the Apothecaries's Society in 1812. In lieu of Humphry Davy, he delivered a series of lectures before the Board of Agriculture and, when Humphry Davy stepped down the following year, he succeeded him as chair of chemistry at the Royal Institution. Michael Faraday assisted him when he lectured at the Royal Institution.

$25.00

CUT SIGNATURE of the English Chemist JOHN THOMAS COOPER.
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CUT SIGNATURE of the English Chemist JOHN THOMAS COOPER.

By Cooper, John Thomas (1790-1854). English chemist who was a supplier of chemicals. He collaborated on producing a number of tools, including a hydrometer.

Circa [1840's]., [1840's].. Good. - John Thomas Cooper's autograph penned on a 7/8 inch high by 2-3/4 inch wide slip of paper cut from a longer letter, mounted on 1-1/8 inch high by 3-1/8 inch wide piece of paper cut from an autograph album. Slightly soiled with minor glue stains. Good. The English chemist John Thomas Cooper (1790-1854) was a noted lecturer, chemical analyst and supplier of chemicals at the time interest in the study of chemistry was growing. He devised and collaborated on the production of tools and techniques, including the development of a hydrometer and an oxy-hydrogen microscope, among others. A number of times, he appeared in court as an expert witness.

$25.00

EVIDENCES OF GLACIAL MAN IN OHIO.
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EVIDENCES OF GLACIAL MAN IN OHIO.

By Wright, G. Frederick.

New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1893., 1893.. Good. - Octavo, softcover bound in printed tan wrappers. The wraps are partially detached. Their edges are darkened with the corners of the front wrap slightly creased. There is dampstaining to the bottom corner of the rear wrap. 11 pages. Black-and-white illustrations, including a map & 2 diagrams. There is dampstaining to the bottom corners of the inside rear wrap & last leaf with very light staining to the remaining leaves. Good. Reprinted from The Popular Science Monthly for May, 1893.Presentation copy with G. Frederick Wright's compliment slip tipped onto the first page.

$25.00

ENCROACHMENTS OF THE SEA. (Cover title).
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ENCROACHMENTS OF THE SEA. (Cover title).

By McGee, William J.

(New York): The Forum, 1890., 1890.. Fair. - Octavo, softcover bound in printed green wrappers. The wraps are chipped with their edges darkened & there is a handwritten label around the tail of the spine. Pages [437]-449. The top page corners are bumped & there is dampstaining to the front edges of the last leaf with lighter dampstaining to the bottom corners of a few previous pages. Good reading copy. First separate edition, reprinted from The Forum for June 1890. The name of the important American geologist R[aphael] Pumpelly is penciled on the front cover in an unidentified hand.William J. McGee [1853-1912] was an American inventor, geologist, anthropologist and ethnologist. He was one of the founders of the American Anthropological Association and its first president [1902]. He was also a founder of the Geological Society of America and vice-president of the National Geographic Society. He was credited with being the first person to use the term "geomorphology in English.In this article, reprinted from The Forum of June 1890, McGee wrote that evidence for sea encroachment appears on many shores and that "...nowhere is it more curious or decisive than along the Gulf coast east of the mouth of the Mississippi. The coast of Florida is skirted by elongated peninsulas and islands called 'keys' separated from the mainland...." The article is a striking foreshadowing of our present concern with global warming.Rare.

$150.00

ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS; OR, NATURAL PHILOSOPHY, GENERAL AND MEDICAL: Written for Universal Use, in Plain or Non-Technical Language; and Containing New Disquisitions and Practical Suggestions. (2 volumes, consisting of volume 1, and volume 2, part 1, complete in itself).
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ELEMENTS OF PHYSICS; OR, NATURAL PHILOSOPHY, GENERAL AND MEDICAL: Written for Universal Use, in Plain or Non-Technical Language; and Containing New Disquisitions and Practical Suggestions. (2 volumes, consisting of volume 1, and volume 2, part 1, complete in itself).

By Arnott, Neil.

Philadelphia: Lea & Blanchard, 1838., 1838.. Good. - Octavo, 2 volumes bound in brown calf ruled in gilt with gilt-titled leather labels on the spines. The covers are rubbed and scuffed with some evidence of early worming. The head and tail of the spines are chipped. 592 pages; and 240 pages, plus an 8 page publisher's catalog with pages numbered [24 ] through 32. There are occasional textual illustrations. The pages are a bit darkened with scattered foxing throughout. The bottom corner of the pages of the last portion of the first volume are lightly dampstained. There is minor evidence of early worming to the front edge of the first 2 preliminary pages of the first volume. Good. These two volumes consist of volume 1 and volume 2, part 1. The work was not completed until 1864.The "Fourth American, from the Fifth English Edition, with additions by Isaac Hays, M.D." of the first volume, and the "Third American from the Last London Edition" of the second volume.

$65.00

CLOSE OF A LETTER SIGNED BY SCOTTISH GEOLOGIST SIR RODERICK MURCHISON WHO FIRST DESCRIBED AND INVESTIGATED THE SILURIAN SYSTEM.
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CLOSE OF A LETTER SIGNED BY SCOTTISH GEOLOGIST SIR RODERICK MURCHISON WHO FIRST DESCRIBED AND INVESTIGATED THE SILURIAN SYSTEM.

By Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey, 1st Baronet. (1792-1871). Scottish geologist who first described and investigated the Silurian system.

25 January, 1868., 1868.. Very good. - Close of a letter on a 2-3/8 inch high by 4 inch wide slip of cream paper mounted on a piece of card of the same size. Signed "Yours faithfully / Roderick Murchison / 25 Jan 1868". Very good. The Scottish geologist Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, 1st Baronet (1792-1871) was the first to describe and investigate the Silurian system. After attending military college, Murchison was with Wellesley in Galicia in 1808 and saw action at Rolica and Vimiero. He served under Sir John Moore during the retreat to and battle of Corunna. After leaving the army, he married Charlotte Hugonin and traveled in Europe for two years, mainly in Italy, before returning to England in 1818 where he met Sir Humphrey Davy. Inspired by Davy to turn his energy to the study of science, Murchison became fascinated by the new science of geology and joined the Geological Society of London. He was in good company among such luminaries as Adam Sedgwick, Charles Lyell and Charles Darwin. Studying the geology of the South of England with his wife, he wrote his first scientific paper in 1825. He and Lyell then went on to explore the volcanic region of the Auvergne, parts of Southern France, Northern Italy, Tyrol and Switzerland and, with Sedgwick, the geological structure of the Alps. In 1831, his study of the greywacke rocks of the border region of Wales and England resulted in the establishment of the Silurian system. This was soon followed by that of the Devonian system. During the last decade of his life he chiefly investigated the Highlands of Scotland. Murchison was one of the founders and a president of the Royal Geographical Society and served on the Royal Commission on the British Museum. In 1855, he was appointed director-general of the British Geological Survey and director of the Royal School of Mines and the Museum of Practical Geology in Jermyn Street, London.

$175.00

HOLOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by PALEONTOLOGIST RICHARD OWEN who is credited with first coining the word DINOSAUR.
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HOLOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by PALEONTOLOGIST RICHARD OWEN who is credited with first coining the word DINOSAUR.

By Owen Richard (1804-1892). Biologist & paleontologist who first coined the word dinosaur ("dinosauria").

Sheen Lodge, Richmond Park, U.K., December 27th, 1867., 1867.. Good. - Approximately 29 words penned in an unknown hand on 6 inch high by 4-1/2 inch wide "Sheen Lodge Richmond Park" stationery with the lodge's name embossed in green at the top. Penned in the third person, the letter indicates that Professor Owen "presents his compliments to Miss Nicholson" and goes on to state that it would be his pleasure to comply with her request "since he can combine it with the slightest element of utility". Signed "Richard Owen" by the paleontologist. A piece of paper which the misspelled word "Proffessor" has been penned in yet a third hand has been glued preceding "his compliments to Miss Nicholson" apparently covering up another word or name. This word on this slip of paper has additionally been highlighted by a scallop edged oval. The letter, once folded, is itself mounted onto thicker stock, likely cut from a scrapbook. Good. The English biologist, comparative anatomist and paleontologist Sir Richard Owen (1804-1892) was the first to coin the word "Dinosauria" and thus "dinosaur". He was responsible for the establishment of the Natural History Museum in South Kensington. Although he strongly believed in evolutionary science, he was an outspoken critic of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection and presaged the emergence of the field of evolutionary developmental biology. His bitter feud with Darwin & T.H. Huxley and accusations of plagiarism marred an otherwise highly significant life.

$275.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED by Atomic Gardening Advocate MURIEL HOWORTH about a leaflet by the political economist Frederick Soddy.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED by Atomic Gardening Advocate MURIEL HOWORTH about a leaflet by the political economist Frederick Soddy.

By Howorth, Muriel.

London, May 20, 1959., 1959.. Very good. - Over 165 words typed on both sides of a 10 inch high by 8 inch wide letterhead of "The Laymen's Institute of Atomic Information for the Peaceful uses of Atomic Energy", with the Institute's banner heading and a half-page list of its officers and patrons printed across the top half of the first page. Albert Einstein is listed as a "Past Patron" and Frederick Soddy as "Past President" In her letter addressed to the economist & book collector Professor Bromberg, Muriel Howorth informs him of a pamphlet she came across that might be of interest to him: "I was cleaning up the Soddy collection to send to the Bodleian Library and came across a leaflet, Social Relations of Science; ... with it were the other papers and I cannot make out whether the foolscap one was written by Soddy because there is no signature, although the corrections look to be in his hand. However, I think they will be more useful to you than to me." She goes on to inform him that she received a letter from "someone in your country interested in economics" and suggested that the correspondent should write to Bromberg. Signed by Muriel Howorth in red ink. Folded for mailing with some minor soiling to the letter and a few very small light tan stains to the bottom right corner. Very good. The founder of "The Laymen's Institute of Atomic Information...." Muriel Howorth (1886-1971) sought to promote the peaceful use of atomic energy. A December 19, 2017 article by Sarah Angliss titled "The Atomic Gardener" published in the journal "Ernest", quotes a period review of her ballet "Isotopia: an Exposition in Atomic Structure" which appeared in October 1950: "a Time magazine journalist recalled 13 members of the Ladies Atomic Energy Club gyrating across the stage in long evening gowns, as they danced and mimed the peaceful uses of the atom to a rapt crowd of 250 other women. Isotopia was one of many creations of the club's visionary founder Muriel Howorth: script writer, choreographer, wardrobe advisor, poet, science fiction novelist, former employee of The Ministry of Information and atomic evangelist. 'To lead women out of the kitchen and into the Atomic Age' was Howorth's aim. 'Not to know all about atomic energy and the wonderful things it can do is like living in the Dark Ages'." In an attempt to increase Britain's food production and create strains of giant agricultural produce, Howorth set up the "Atomic Gardener" program in 1959 enlisting the assistance of hundreds of amateur gardeners throughout Britain (and eventually America) who planted crops of irradiated seeds.The recipient, Professor Bromberg, was a collector of books, ephemera and autograph material relating to economics, expecially the works of J.M. Keynes.

$350.00

A BEAUTIFUL ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF ALBERT EINSTEIN EMERGING FROM UNDER AN ARCH HONORING JERUSALEM.
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A BEAUTIFUL ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF ALBERT EINSTEIN EMERGING FROM UNDER AN ARCH HONORING JERUSALEM.

By (Einstein, Albert). Harris, Martin.

[circa 1940's]., [circa 1940's].. Very good. - A 9 inch high by 7 inch wide black & white photograph of Albert Einstein on 14 inch high by 11 inch wide photo paper. The portrait depicts the disheveled scientist emerging from under an arch proclaiming, in a quote from Psalm 137, verse 5: "If I forget thee O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning". Depicted in mid-stride as he walks towards the camera Einstein, impeccably dressed, has his hand held up as if holding a cigarette. A gentle smile illuminates the face of the great scientist and humanitarian. This is one of a very few prints of a photograph by Martin Harris pulled from the original negative in the 1990's and offered for sale at a special fund-raising event. An auction sticker, with the number "88", is mounted on the verso. Near fine. The photographer Martin Harris (1908-1971) worked for "Stars and Stripes" during the second World War. He later worked for "Look", "Life", "Colliers", and "The Saturday Evening Post" among other periodicals. Two of his photographs were selected as covers for "Life" magazine during his time with that periodical.

$450.00

TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY MINERALOGIST AND VICE PRESIDENT OF TIFFANY\'S GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ REQUESTING TICKETS TO A TRAPROCK LECTURE.
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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY MINERALOGIST AND VICE PRESIDENT OF TIFFANY'S GEORGE FREDERICK KUNZ REQUESTING TICKETS TO A TRAPROCK LECTURE.

By Kunz, George Frederick. (1856-1932). American mineralogist and vice president of Tiffany & Co. where he sought out fine gems for his clients

New York: October 16th, 1922., 1922.. Very good. - 31 words typed on an 8-1/2 inch high by 5-5/8 inch wide sheet of cream letterhead with Tiffany's address printed in raised lettering at the top. The paper is watermarked Aurelius and is handmade. The watermark illustrates a large bird, possibly an eagle. Signed "George F Kunz". There is a light smudge above 1 word of the printed address. The recipient has penciled the date the tickets were mailed at the foot of the letter. Folded once for mailing. Very good. Kunz writes to J. B. Pond of the Pond Lecture Bureau, New York City, asking for tickets to a lecture: "I would greatly appreciate having two tickets for the lecture by Dr. Walter E. Traprock on his North Pole trip."George Frederick Kunz [1856-1932], an American mineralogist and mineral collector, took an interest in minerals from a very young age. With no formal training he taught himself mineralogy from books and field work to the point where his expertise won him a job with Tiffany & Co. His knowledge and enthusiasm propelled him into a vice presidency by the time he was 23. He headed the U.S. mining and mineralogical exhibits at five international expositions between 1889 and 1904 and was a member of such professional organizations as the Mineralogical Society of America and the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. He was a research curator at the New York City's Museum of Natural History and was the leading advocate for the establishment of the international carat as a unit of measure for precious gems.

$125.00

CHYMIA: Annual Studies in the History of Chemistry. Volume 2.

By Davis, Tenney; Editor-in-Chief.

Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania, 1949., 1949.. Good. - Octavo, navy blue cloth. The binding is rubbed with the corners slightly bumped. The spine & its gilt titling are faded. x & 143 pages plus errata/corrigenda page. Black-and-white plates and illustrations, including facsimiles, & tables. There is some foxing & darkening to the pastedowns & endpapers with a bookseller's label on the front pastedown. Good. <p>The second volume in this annual series.

$10.00

THE SURVIVAL OF CHARLES DARWIN: A Biography of a Man and an Idea.
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THE SURVIVAL OF CHARLES DARWIN: A Biography of a Man and an Idea.

By Clark, Ronald W.

New York: Random House, (1984)., (1984).. Very good. - Octavo, gray boards backed with dark blue cloth & titled in gilt in a dust wrapper. The rear panel of the dust wrapper is lightly rubbed & there are tiny chips to the top of its front panel & the head of its spine. x & 449 pages. 16 pages of black-and-white illustrations. The top edge of the book is lightly foxed. Very good. First edition.

$15.00

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