Fiction by Region

From To Kill a Mockingbird to Leaves Of Grass, from Gone With the Wind to Elmer, we can help you find the fiction by region books you are looking for. As the world's largest independent marketplace for new, used and rare books, you always get the best in service and value when you buy from Biblio.com.au, and all of your purchases are backed by our return guarantee.

Top Sellers in Fiction by Region

To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

by Harper Lee

To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.
The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby

by F Scott Fitzgerald

Written in 1925, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby is widely
considered to be one of the author’s greatest works. Set in New York City and
Long Island during the Roaring Twenties, the focus of the story is (of course)
its title character, Jay Gatsby, and his unswerving desire to be reunited with
Daisy Buchanan, the love he lost five years earlier. However, Nick Carraway,
who happens to be both Gatsby’s neighbor and Daisy’s cousin, narrates Gatsby's journey
from poverty to wealth, into the... Read more about this item
Animal Farm

Animal Farm

by George Orwell

Animal Farm is a dystopian novella by George Orwell. Published in England on 17 August 1945, the book reflects events leading up to and during the Stalin era before World War II. Orwell, a democratic socialist and a member of the Independent Labour Party for many years, was a critic of Joseph Stalin and was suspicious of Moscow-directed Stalinism after his experiences with the NKVD during the Spanish Civil War.
Gone With the Wind

Gone With the Wind

by Margaret Mitchell

Margaret Mitchell only published one complete novel, but it was quite the book - Gone With the Wind earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and National Book Award for 1936. The epic romance tale set in and around Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War has remained a bestseller, even before the equally popular film starring Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh was made in 1939.
Nineteen Eighty-Four

Nineteen Eighty-Four

by George Orwell

Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) by George
Orwell has become the definitive dystopian novel of the twentieth
century. Originally published on June 8, 1949 by Secker and
Warburg in the United Kingdom, the book follows the main character,
Winston Smith, through his disillusionment with totalitarianism and a
doomed struggle of resistance. George Orwell is a pen-name, Orwell's
real name was Eric Blair. -
The Old Man and The Sea

The Old Man and The Sea

by Ernest Hemingway

This novella, only 140 pages, was first
printed in its entirety in Life Magazine on September 1, 1952. It inspired a buying frenzy - selling over five million copies of the
magazine in just two days!
The story about an aging Cuban
fisherman wrangling a large marlin in the gulf stream was written in
1951 in Cuba and published in 1952. In 1953, it won the Pulitzer Prize
for Fiction and led to Hemingway's nomination for the Nobel Prize in
Literature in 1954.
Man's struggle against nature is the... Read more about this item
The Grapes Of Wrath

The Grapes Of Wrath

by John Steinbeck

John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath
stands as a pivotal piece of American literature. The story follows
the Joad family (and thousands of others) as they are driven from the
Oklahoma farm where they are sharecroppers during the Great
Depression. The drought, economic hardship, and changes in financial
and agricultural industries send them searching for dignity and
honest work in the bountiful state of California.


The novel earned Steinbeck the Pulitzer
Prize for fiction in 1940, and inspired the... Read more about this item
Moby Dick

Moby Dick

by Herman Melville

Melville's classic was first published in England as three volumes titled The Whale in October 1851. Slow sales of Melville's previously books convinced Publisher L. Richard Bentley to reduce the printing to only 500 copies, and of that, only 300 sold in the first 4 months. The remaining unbound sheets were bound in a cheaper casing in 1852, and in 1853 there were still enough remaining sheets to again bind into an even cheaper edition.Melville changed the title to Moby Dick a month later, November 1851,... Read more about this item
Ulysses

Ulysses

by James Joyce

Ulysses is a modernist novel by James Joyce. It was first
serialized in The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920 and later
published by Shakespeare and Company in 1922. Originally, Joyce conceived of
Ulysses as a short story to be included in Dubliners, but decided instead to
publish it as a long novel, situated as a sort of sequel to A Portrait of the
Artist as a Young Man, picking up Stephen Dedalus’s life over a year later.
Ulysses takes place on a single day, June 16, 1904, in Dublin -... Read more about this item
Of Mice and Men

Of Mice and Men

by John Steinbeck

Of Mice and Men is a novella written by Nobel Prize-winning author John Steinbeck. Published in 1937, it tells the tragic story of George Milton and Lennie Small, two displaced migrant ranch workers during the Great Depression in California.An intimate portrait of two men who cherish the slim bond between them and the dream they share in a world marred by petty tyranny, misunderstanding, jealousy, and callousness. Clinging to each other in their loneliness and alienation, George and his simple-minded... Read more about this item
Atlas Shrugged

Atlas Shrugged

by Ayn Rand

Ayn Rand in her most controversial book yet, depicts a dystopian United State. A world of private businesses that are increasingly penalized and weighted through laws and regulations, stepping over the people who carry out that labor. As a mysterious figure, John Gault appears on the scene; the country’s top banker, an oil producer, a professor, a composer, and a distinguished judge disappear without a trace, abandoning their professions and loved ones. In turn a revolution begins, creating a new... Read more about this item
Catch-22

Catch-22

by Joseph Heller

Catch-22 is Joseph Heller’s first novel and his most
acclaimed work. Set during World War II, the novel uses a distinctive non-chronological
third-person omniscient narration, mainly focusing on the life of Captain John
Yossarian, a U.S. Army Air Forces B-25 bombardier. Occasionally, the narrator
also shows us how other characters, such as the chaplain or Hungry Joe,
experience the world around them. As the novel’s events are described from the
different points of view through separate... Read more about this item
Things Fall Apart

Things Fall Apart

by Chinua Achebe

In his debut novel, Chinua Achebe challenges our written perspective of history and portrays the devastating influence of colonization in late 19th century Nigeria.  Things Fall Apart explores one man's futile resistance to the devaluing of his Igbo traditions by British political and religious forces and his despair as his community capitulates to the powerful new order. The story follows Okonkwo, a man known for his fierce heart and physical strength, as he navigates his personal demons and his... Read more about this item
Rebecca

Rebecca

by Daphne Du Maurier

An orphaned young woman working as a maid is swept off her feet by a wealthy widowed Englishman, and quickly married him. But when she arrives at his estate she learns she pales in comparison with his seemingly perfect deceased first wife Rebecca, especially in the eyes of the sinister housekeeper Mrs. Danvers. When Rebecca’s body is found on her shipwrecked boat the dark secrets held by the husband are discovered as well. Rebecca has had many adaptations in film, radio, and television,... Read more about this item
East Of Eden

East Of Eden

by John Steinbeck

East of Eden is a novel by John Steinbeck, published in 1952. It tells the multi-generational story of two families, the Hamiltons and the Trasks, in California's Salinas Valley. The novel explores themes of good and evil, love and hate, and the human capacity for both. It also delves into the nature of family dynamics, inheritance, and the American dream. The characters are complex and nuanced, and the novel's narrative structure allows for a deep exploration of their motivations and emotions. East of... Read more about this item
The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

Commonly named among the Great American novels, The Adventures of
Huckleberry Finn, written by Mark Twain, is generally regarded as the
sequel to his earlier novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; however, in
Huckleberry Finn, Twain focused increasingly on the institution of
slavery and the South. Narrated by Huckleberry “Huck” Finn in Southern
antebellum vernacular, the novel gives vivid descriptions of people and
daily life along the Mississippi River while following the adventure of
Huck and... Read more about this item
One Hundred Years Of Solitude

One Hundred Years Of Solitude

by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude chronicles the life of Macondo, a fictional town based in part of Garcia Marquez's hometown of Aracataca, Columbia, and seven generations of the founding family, the Buendias. He creates a complex world with characters and events that display the full range of human experience. For the reader, the pleasure of the novel derives from its fast-paced narrative, humor, vivid characters, and fantasy elements. In this 'magic realism', the author combines imaginative flights of... Read more about this item
On the Road

On the Road

by Jack Kerouac

Perhaps
the most famous and influential of the Beat novels, Jack Kerouac's On
the Road represents much of what
made the Beat and Counterculture movements so unique and important.
The plot concerning the road trips and adventures experienced by
Kerouac and his friends is well-known, as are the rumors and tall
tales of the books' production.


Kerouac
often claimed that the wrote On the Road
in a mere three weeks on a single 120-foot scroll of paper. Although
that scroll does indeed exist and is featured... Read more about this item
A Confederacy Of Dunces

A Confederacy Of Dunces

by John Kennedy Toole

A Confederacy of Dunces is a picaresque novel written by John Kennedy Toole, published in 1980, 11 years after the author died by suicide at the age of 31. The book was published through the efforts of writer Walker Percy (who also contributed a revealing foreword) and Toole's mother, Thelma Toole. In 1981, it won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, granting posthumous recognition to John Kennedy Toole. The novel has since gained a cult following and is celebrated as a classic of American literature.Set in... Read more about this item
For Whom the Bell Tolls

For Whom the Bell Tolls

by Ernest Hemingway

Many consider For Whom the Bell Tolls to be author Ernest Hemingway’s finest work. Inspired by Hemingway’s time as a war correspondent for The North American Newspaper Alliance during the Spanish Civil War, For Whom the Bell Tolls is a stark and brutal commentary on the nature of war, sacrifice, and death. In fact, many believe his work is among the best depictions of the Spanish Civil War written. As with some of Hemingway’s other work, many of the characters, experiences, and... Read more about this item
War and Peace

War and Peace

by Leo Tolstoy

War and Peace, a Russian novel by Leo Tolstoy, is considered one of the world's greatest works of fiction. It is regarded, along with Anna Karenina (1873–7), as his finest literary achievement. Epic in scale, War and Peace delineates in graphic detail events leading up to Napoleon's invasion of Russia, and the impact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society, as seen through the eyes of five Russian aristocratic families. First titled '1805' the first installment was published in the January... Read more about this item
Sun Also Rises

Sun Also Rises

by Ernest Hemingway

Based on real events and acquaintances of Hemingway, Sun Also Rises is about American and English expats in Pamplona.
A Farewell To Arms

A Farewell To Arms

by Ernest Hemingway

Set during World War 1, Ernest Hemingway’s A
Farewell to Arms is the story of Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American serving
as an ambulance driver in the Italian army, and his love affair with an English
nurse named Catherine Barkley. The novel is semi-autobiographical, based on
Hemingway's own experiences serving in the Italian campaigns during the war.
While some assume the title of the work to be taken from a poem by 16th century
English dramatist George Peele, others believe it to be a simple pun... Read more about this item
The Count Of Monte Cristo

The Count Of Monte Cristo

by Alexandre Dumas

The Count of Monte Cristo is an adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas, often considered one of Dumas' most popular works alongside The Three Musketeers. The story takes place in France, Italy, and islands in the Mediterranean during the historical events of the Bourbon Restoration through the reign of Louis-Philippe of France. It tells an incredible story of vengeance, following the journey of a wrongfully imprisoned man.
Leaves Of Grass

Leaves Of Grass

by Walt Whitman

Leaves of Grass (1855) is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman. Among the poems in the collection are "Song of Myself," "I Sing the Body Electric," "Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking," and in later editions, Whitman's elegy to the assassinated President Abraham Lincoln, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd. " Whitman spent his entire life writing Leaves of Grass, revising it in several editions until his death. The first edition published in 1855 contained 12 poems on 95 pages.... Read more about this item

Fiction by Region Books & Ephemera

Gone With the Wind

Gone With the Wind

by Mitchell, Margaret

Margaret Mitchell only published one complete novel, but it was quite the book - Gone With the Wind earned her the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 and National Book Award for 1936. The epic romance tale set in and around Atlanta, Georgia during the American Civil War has remained a bestseller, even before the equally popular film starring Clark Gable and Vivian Leigh was made in 1939.
Shantaram

Shantaram

by Roberts, Gregory David

Gregory David Roberts penned Shantaram as a mostly autobiographical novel. Shantaram is the name given to the main character, Mr. Lindsay Ford, also known as Linbaba.
Ford is a convicted Australian bank robber and heroin addict who escaped and made his way to Mumbai, planning on leaving for Germany, but ends up staying and setting up a free health clinic in the slums, staying for over 10 years.
To Kill a Mockingbird

To Kill a Mockingbird

by Lee, Harper

To Kill a Mockingbird is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee published in 1960. It was instantly successful and has become a classic of modern American literature. The plot and characters are loosely based on the author's observations of her family and neighbors, as well as on an event that occurred near her hometown in 1936, when she was 10 years old. The novel is renowned for its warmth and humor, despite dealing with serious issues of rape and racial inequality.
The Secret River

The Secret River

by Grenville, Kate

The Secret River, written by Kate Grenville in 2005, is a historical fiction about an early 19th century Englishman transported to Australia for theft. The story begins with an insightful flashback to England, and goes on to explore issues surrounding the question of what might have happened when Europeans colonised land already inhabited by Aboriginal people. According to a review in The Telegraph, The Secret River has more action than Grenville's previous novel,The Idea of Perfection.
True History Of the Kelly Gang

True History Of the Kelly Gang

by Carey, Peter

True History of the Kelly Gang is a historical novel by Australian writer Peter Carey. It was first published in Brisbane by the University of Queensland Press in 2000. It won the 2001 Man Booker Prize and the Commonwealth Writers Prize in the same year. Despite its title, the book is fiction and a variation on the Ned Kelly story.
Albino

Albino

by Cope, Jack

La Cle Sur La Porte

La Cle Sur La Porte

by Marie Cardinal

The Novel and Revolution

The Novel and Revolution

by Swingewood, Alan

Elmer

Elmer

by Faulkner, William